Britain takes inspiration from Brazil and doubles ethanol to gasoline

Britain takes inspiration from Brazil and doubles ethanol to gasoline

The UK has decided that new gasoline sold in its territory will meet a new standard for reducing carbon emissions. Called the E10, it follows the line of what we’ve seen for a while in Brazil.

The government has set out to increase the percentage of ethanol in this gasoline from 5% to 10% (the reason for the name E10), something that has already been established by countries such as Belgium, Finland, France and Germany.

In the case of Brazil, the percentage is even higher: 27% for regular and additive gasoline.

Quantitatively, the British government says that E10 gasoline reduces CO2 emissions by more than 750,000 tonnes a year – the equivalent of removing 350,000 cars from roads and streets. Motorized transport accounts for 24% of the UK’s total emissions.

UK Secretary of State for Transport Grant Shapps said: “We are moving faster than ever to cut emissions from our roads, cleaning our air as we move towards a zero-emissions transport future.” are.”

“While more and more drivers are driving electric vehicles, we can take some steps to reduce emissions from the millions of vehicles already on our roads. The small switch to E10 gasoline will help drivers across the country across the country to reduce the environmental impact of every trip. will help reduce it.”

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About the author: Cory Weinberg

Cory Weinberg covers the intersection of tech and cities. That means digging into how startups and big tech companies are trying to reshape real estate, transportation, urban planning, and travel. Previously, he reported on Bay Area housing and commercial real estate for the San Francisco Business Times. He received a "best young journalist" award from the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

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