timetable, tv channel, live broadcast

timetable, tv channel, live broadcast

After 35 years, the Dutch Grand Prix, held in Zandvoort, finally returned to the Formula 1 calendar.

The popularity of the sport in the Netherlands has grown at a rapid pace since its emergence. Max Verstappen In 2015, so much so that in 2019 an agreement was reached for the country to host Formula 1 races from 2020.

Army of Orange had to wait another year to drive home again with the global pandemic postponing last year’s event, but that wait will finally be over.

It will also be quite the show, with 70,000 fans who will be able to come and watch Verstappen’s attempt to regain the championship lead.

Here’s everything you need to know ahead of the 2021 Dutch Grand Prix…

When is the 2021 Dutch Grand Prix?

Exercise 1: Friday, September 3, 11:30 am to 12:30 pm (10:30 am to 11:30 pm UK time)
Training 2: Friday, 3 September, 1500-1600 (1400-1500 UK time)
Training 3: Saturday, 4 September, 1200-1300 (1100-1200 UK time)
Qualification: Saturday, 4 September, 1500 (UK time at 2:00 pm)
Race: Sunday, 5 September, 1500 (1400 UK time)

Where will the 2021 Netherlands Grand Prix be held?

Zandvoort is by no means new to the world of Formula 1, having run a race for the first time in 1952 and did so 29 times before the Dutch GP was dropped from the calendar after the 1985 edition.

However, today’s circuit is quite different from that of the riders who have undergone many changes prior to their return.

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The main thing is the introduction of inclined corners. This bank can be found at 19 degrees, twice as long as the Indianapolis bank, at the Huygenholtzbocht and Ari Luendijkbocht turns, the latter being the last on the lap.

in totality, 4,252 km track It has 13 turns, lots of upgrade changes, and lots of high-speed sections, and any mistake is likely to be costly.

Opportunities for easy overtaking are few and far between, and drivers will have to take a lot of risk if they want to pass during the race. Hope to see some great moves.

Where can I watch the 2021 Dutch Grand Prix?

In the UK, pay TV broadcaster Sky Sports will show all practice, qualifying and race sessions on its dedicated F1 channel. You can also access live streams of your coverage through Now TV. The open station, Channel 4, will broadcast the highlights during race weekend.

F1 TV Pro viewers can watch all the Zandvoort action live. Check if F1 TV Pro is available in your country.

Subscribers to the official F1 app can access live data during all race weekend sessions, as well as radio commentary on race day.

PlanetF1 will broadcast live timing and expert commentary on each FP1 session from Friday morning until the Sunday afternoon race.

The Netherlands Grand Prix will be televised live in the following media in other major markets:

United States: ESPN
Canada: RDS (French), TSN (English)
Australia: Fox Sports
France: Chanel +
Italy: Sky Sport F1
Germany: Sky Sport F1
Spain: DAZN
Holland: Zigo Sport
Brazil: Bando
Japan: DAZN

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What is the weather forecast for the 2021 Dutch Grand Prix?

Friday, September 3 – 4 pm, The Sun
Saturday, September 4 – 5 pm, The Sun
Sunday, September 5 – 19c, sunny period

Netherlands Grand Prix Instructions

Zandvoort is a spa town located on the north-west coast of the Netherlands.

The nearest city, train station and airport are Amsterdam, and getting to the runway in the Dutch capital is very easy and convenient. So, if you are traveling by plane or train from another country, going first is probably your best option.

With only 15 miles running in both locations, it takes only 40 minutes to drive from downtown to the circuit, although the high traffic volume can make the journey slightly longer on race weekends.

There is no problem getting to Zandvoort, even without a car. A train from Amsterdam Central to Zandvoort aan Zee takes about half an hour, while bus number 80 takes over 50 minutes if there is no bad traffic.

Andreko: Circuit Park Zandvoort, Mayor of Alfenstraat 108, 2041 KP Zandvoort, Holanda.

Which drivers won the Dutch Grand Prix?

As it was a regular sport on the calendar from the 1950s to the mid-1980s, many legendary drivers tasted victory on Dutch soil.

The regular doer of this is two-time world champion Jim Clark, who was a four-time winning driver; In 1963, 1964, 1965 and 1967.

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Jackie Stewart and Niki Lauda were two winners at the three-time Zandvoort, with Scott dominated in the late 1960s and early 1970s, and Austrian victories in 1974, 1977 and 1985.

Alberto Ascari, Jack Brabham, James Hunt and Alain Prost won twice, no driver ever winning the race once. That, of course, will change this year.

The last 10 winners of the Dutch Grand Prix are as follows:

1985: Niki Lauda (Austria, McLaren)
1984: Alain Prost (France, McLaren)
1983: René Arnoux (France, Ferrari)
1982: Didier Peroni (France, Ferrari)
1981: Alain Prost (France, Renault)
1980: Nelson Piquet (Brazil, Brabham)
1979: Alan Jones (Australia, Williams)
1978: Mario Andretti (United States, Lotus)
1977: Niki Lauda (Austria, Ferrari)
1976: James Hunt (Great Britain, McLaren)

What are the final places in the F1 Championship?

Drivers Championship

Lewis Hamilton – 202.5 points

Max Verstappen – 1995 Pontos

Lando Norris – 113 points

Valtteri Bottas – 108 points

Sergio Perez – 104 points

Constructors’ Championship

Mercedes – 310.5 points

Red Bull 303.5 Pontos

McLaren – 169 points

Ferrari – 165.5 points

The full classification of F1 championships is right here

Tire options for the 2021 Dutch Grand Prix

Given the high-speed section and sharp turns, it should come as no surprise that Pirelli is bringing a more sought-after range of tires to the Dutch Grand Prix.

C1 compound will be hard tyre, C2 will be medium and soft compound C3 will be rubber.

Given the climate in the spa, which is not far from the circuit, it is not surprising that intermediate or wet seasons are also used.

About the author: Sarah Gracie

Sarahis a reporter covering Amazon. She previously covered tech and transportation, and she broke stories on Uber's finances, self-driving car program, and cultural crisis. Before that, she covered cybersecurity in finance. Sarah's work has appeared in The Wall Street Journal, Bloomberg, Politico, and the Houston Chronicle.

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