4 things consider when mounting a TV onto your wall

Buying a TV is easy however, when it comes to mounting TV onto your wall and TV aerial installation, those can be the challenging part. If you are a fan of a less cluttered look, TV wall mounting is for you but, there are many factors to consider when fixing your TV onto your wall to avoid any future problems arising. First of all, it is important to check what kind of wall you are mounting your TV too whether it be a stud wall or a brick wall. Tv aerial installation  After this is detected, you can consider the following tips when fixing your TV to your wall.

Consider the positioning of your TV

When buying your new TV, it is important to consider where you are going to place it, as for many people, this needs to be positioned in front of a couch or a bed depending on what room it is placed in. The length of the cable must be considered, as will the distance to the wall outlet. Alongside this, try to avoid placing your TV above a fireplace, this is proven to reduce the life expectancy of your TV and excess heat heading towards your TV will only result in damage. Although it is not always possible, especially if your TV is placed in an open room with a variety of windows, we recommend that you keep your TV screen out with sunlight that can beam through your windows. As expected, this will massively interfere with your TV experience and may result in a lower quality image being displayed to the viewer.

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Consider the height of your TV

Getting rid of a TV stand will save you a lot of floor space, that is why more and more people opt to mount their TV onto their wall, however, the main question people face is how high or how low to mount the TV. If the TV is mounted too low or too high, it can be frustrating to fix, especially if you are required to cover holes and dents within the wall from the fierst fixing. It is important to firstly consider the size of your TV and consider that the TV should be measured from the floor to the middle of the TV, not from the floor to the ceiling. The TV must also be positioned so that it catches the eye level of the viewer, and the eye-level is when the viewer is positioned on a sofa or bed, not standing up. This is important to consider so that neck and head strains are avoided when watching the TV. If you have any concerns about TV positioning, the professionals at mikeharrisaerialandsatellite.co.uk would be happy to answer any questions you may have.

Consider the TV mount and how safely it is attached to your wall

TVs are large, pricey electronic devices. It would be devastating to mount a TV to your wall for it to fall back down as this could result in damage to the TV and the surrounding areas. Not only this, if it were to fall on someone, it could seriously hurt them. Mounting a TV is a two-person job, it is not advised to do this yourself! The installation should be so much easier with two people meaning that the risk of this being incorrectly fixed to the wall is reduced.  The wall bracket for the TV needs to be selected carefully in accordance with the TV size and weight itself. The VESA size you select is also vital. This size must be compatible with the mounting holes in the back of your TV so that they can link in with each other correctly.

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Consider reading the instructions fully to ensure the job is done successfully

Finally, although TV instructions do appear to be extremely lengthy, it is important to spend time reading the document to ensure the job has been done to the highest standard. After all, what would be the point in spending all of that money on a TV for it to become damaged or installed incorrectly? If you are not a tech person, and this process is of difficulty to you, do not hesitate to contact any of the professionals at mikeharrisaerialandsatellite.co.uk.

About the author: Cory Weinberg

Cory Weinberg covers the intersection of tech and cities. That means digging into how startups and big tech companies are trying to reshape real estate, transportation, urban planning, and travel. Previously, he reported on Bay Area housing and commercial real estate for the San Francisco Business Times. He received a "best young journalist" award from the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

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