Australia’s most popular children’s names surfaced, including names that no one wants

Australia's most popular children's names surfaced, including names that no one wants

The two names declined the most in the ranking. Photo / 123RF

Oliver and Charlotte’s name has consistently topped the list of Australia’s most popular children’s names for the past 10 years.

But the names that saw the biggest drop in rank include Dylan and Sarah.

In 2020, Dylan was 97th overall, dropping 61 places from 36 in 2010, while Sarah, currently 91st, dropped 69 places.

Although parents still call their children Dylan and Sarah, it is in decline, according to the latest study by McCrindle Research.

“Both names have been in the top 100 for the past decade, but although they are a popular baby name, they have actually fallen,” said social researcher Ashley Fell of Australia’s Top Baby Names 2021 report.

She told news.com.au that names were particularly important in the 1980s and 1990s, but parents of the alpha generation (2010–2020) are looking for more unique, diverse and strong names.

“In today’s digitally-connected world, a name is more than what a teacher calls you: a name is a social media identifier, a brand, a web domain, it can go to extremes, but it can be a part of this digital world. The reality is we live in it.

“Generation Alpha parents don’t want super-generic and generic names, so we’re seeing more diversity in the top 100.”

There are many Australian parents who love traditional names.  Photo / 123RF
There are many Australian parents who love traditional names. Photo / 123RF

She said that for girls you are seeing more trends in botanical names like willow, ivy, violet and daisy, and even in colors like ruby ​​and scarlet.

Nicknames such as Jack have been in place of Jackson for children.

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Falling baby and girl names

Other boys who have fallen dramatically include Matthew (currently ranked 75), Luke (81st), Riley (47th) and Danielle (58th), while for girls it is Madison (82nd) Ranked 4th), Lara (88th place). ), Summer (71) and Claire (90).

However, there are still many Australian parents who love traditional names, especially one with a genuine connection, such as Charlotte, which has been crowned as the number one name in eight of the last 10 years.

While Charlotte has maintained her rule, Amelia has now renamed Olivia with the name of the second most popular girl.

Although in slightly different order, the names of the top 10 girls remained almost unchanged last year, except for Matilda who changed Harper’s name.

Oliver, a name given to more than 2,000 boys of the Alpha Generation, has also continued to be popular over the past decade, ranking him eight consecutive years since he defeated Jack in 2013.

Last year, Elijah entered the top 10 boys’ names at the expense of the name James (which dropped from 10 to 15).

Fell, a co-author of Generation Alpha, said that one of the most interesting parts of his analysis was the girl’s names (Millie, 64th, Billy, 52nd, Sadie, 58th) and “or” between names ending in “.” Ie “was discovering the trend. . For people like Arlo (33rd) and Hugo (34th).

“In these new and emerging names, we see trends in girls’ names that end in vowel or vowel sounds and botanical effects and colors,” Fell said.

“We also see celebrity influence, Luna’s popularity has been increasing since the birth of Luna, the daughter of John Legend and Chrissy Teigen in 2016.

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“There is also a tendency to shorten names and add an ‘ie’ to the end (Elsie, Millie and Sadie),” Fell said.

There were also names of 10 new girls who made it to the top 100, while only five new boys’ names made it to the cut.

For a list of the top 100 names for girls and boys, see Mccrindle.com.au

About the author: Cory Weinberg

Cory Weinberg covers the intersection of tech and cities. That means digging into how startups and big tech companies are trying to reshape real estate, transportation, urban planning, and travel. Previously, he reported on Bay Area housing and commercial real estate for the San Francisco Business Times. He received a "best young journalist" award from the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

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