Bolivia condemns “carbon colonialism” of developed countries

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Glasgow (United Kingdom), 1 November (EFE). Bolivian President Luis Arce at the inauguration of the 26th United Nations Conference on Climate Change (COP26) this Monday called on developed countries to assume their “responsibility” in climate change. Crisis and condemned what he called “carbon colonialism”.

“We feel that developed countries are only buying time, have no sense of responsibility towards humanity and Mother Earth. Credibility is at risk,” Ars said at a meeting of world leaders in Glasgow, Scotland.

The president argued that speeches in which the richest states “appear as champions in the fight against the climate crisis” are “far from the truth”.

“If developed countries want to lead the fight against the climate crisis, they must promote the distribution of atmospheric space on an equity basis with equal but different responsibilities” and this takes into account each country’s “historic responsibilities”. Keeps up, Ars said.

The Bolivian leader emphasized that the structure promoted by the richest countries was, in fact, “a new process of global recolonization”, which he called “carbon colonialism”.

“They are trying to impose their own rules of the game in climate negotiations to promote the new green capitalist system, and developing countries need to adopt these rules without a choice,” he lamented.

Ars also stressed the need to promote the transfer of financial resources and technical means to developing countries.

According to the minister, the Bolivian government is preparing a plan for 2030 that “reaffirms the national commitment to the climate crisis in the water, energy, forestry and agriculture sectors.”

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It also expressed its desire to reach agreements between La Paz and international co-operation institutions to promote “financing and other means of implementation” to achieve the country’s “mitigation, adaptation and comprehensive development goals”.

“The solution to the climate crisis does not come from more green capitalism and more global carbon markets. The solution is to change the model of civilization and move towards an alternative model of capitalism” that allows “living in harmony with Mother Earth”. The President of Bolivia said. EFE

About the author: Cory Weinberg

Cory Weinberg covers the intersection of tech and cities. That means digging into how startups and big tech companies are trying to reshape real estate, transportation, urban planning, and travel. Previously, he reported on Bay Area housing and commercial real estate for the San Francisco Business Times. He received a "best young journalist" award from the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

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