Britons will need a photo ID to vote. The poor and ethnic minorities will be harmed, critics warned – Ob …

Britons will need a photo ID to vote.  The poor and ethnic minorities will be harmed, critics warned - Ob ...

In the next elections to the British Parliament, three years from now, only voters with photo ID will be allowed to vote. The amendment to the law, which would thus approach the reality of many other countries, including Portugal, aims to reduce electoral fraud rates and should be announced in the traditional opening speech of the legislative session delivered by the Queen this Tuesday. In England, the latter formally later, in office by the government.

In anticipation, the critics are already Started to make myself heard And to warn that young people, the poorest population and ethnic minorities, who often do not have a driving license nor a passport, can be removed from democracy. Altogether, he estimates, these conditions will account for a quarter of the population.

If this was enough before appearing “without prior planning” and voting, the Guardian writes, some preparation will be necessary with this new law – in addition to the documents already in place, the government has already stated that the citizen-able Will request voters in advance with photography in areas of residence, but rehearsal already conducted in local elections in 2018 showed that Hundreds of people were unable to vote To not complete procedures on time.

In addition to this requirement, the number of postal votes sent by third parties will also be limited, aimed at reducing electoral fraud. This, emphasizes guardianship, comes at a time when the National Election Commission ensures that the UK has “low levels of electoral fraud”. In the last parliamentary elections in 2019, one person was convicted of imposing another voter, the other was appointed by the police as he prepared to do so.

Cory Weinberg

About the author: Cory Weinberg

Cory Weinberg covers the intersection of tech and cities. That means digging into how startups and big tech companies are trying to reshape real estate, transportation, urban planning, and travel. Previously, he reported on Bay Area housing and commercial real estate for the San Francisco Business Times. He received a "best young journalist" award from the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

Related Posts

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *