Coronavirus: Some Randox check kits ‘may not fulfill safety standards’

Coronavirus: Some Randox test kits 'may not meet safety standards'

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The swabs in some batches of one particular brand of coronavirus residence-test kits are “not up to conventional”, Overall health Secretary Matt Hancock has stated.

As a precaution, the govt states the kits built by Randox really should not be applied right until even further observe.

There is no evidence of hurt staying done and no influence on access to testing, Mr Hancock stated.

Randox claims to be responsible for up to 17% of the total exams carried out in the Uk.

The business is a healthcare diagnostics group based mostly out of County Antrim in Northern Eire.

The swabs are utilized to accumulate a sample from the back again of the throat and nose, which is then sent to a lab to examination for the virus.

Mr Hancock told the Commons he was contacted on Wednesday afternoon about the issue.

He said the certification guiding the CE protection mark on the solution was “not forthcoming”.

In a assertion before on Thursday, the Department of Well being and Social Care stated: “The chance to safety is minimal and check results from Randox kits are not influenced.”

It claimed it would be “supporting all screening configurations to obtain substitution kits as before long as probable”.

Checks kits developed by Randox Laboratories, which have been employed in care residences and sent to folks at home, are plainly marked with the company’s title.

Kits that have by now been employed can however be gathered for processing as usual.

Baroness Dido Harding, head of NHS Test and Trace in England, which has a independent agreement with Randox, mentioned it was far too early to comment on the impact of the protection challenge, but she stated examination benefits were “not influenced”.

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Cory Weinberg

About the author: Cory Weinberg

Cory Weinberg covers the intersection of tech and cities. That means digging into how startups and big tech companies are trying to reshape real estate, transportation, urban planning, and travel. Previously, he reported on Bay Area housing and commercial real estate for the San Francisco Business Times. He received a "best young journalist" award from the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

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