Covid-19 Live Updates and Tracker

Covid-19 Live Updates and Tracker

Officials said most of the redirected money would go to vaccination of children and influenza surveillance. But the United States Agency for International Development will continue to provide 68 68 million to the WHO to assist in its work in Libya and Syria and to eradicate polio in Pakistan and Afghanistan.

The WHO declined to comment, citing statements made to reporters when the administration announced its intention to withdraw. At the time, WHO Director-General Tedros Adanom Gheberyesus said the agency regretted Mr. Trump’s decision. “The United States has been a long and generous friend of the WHO and we hope it will continue to be so,” said Dr. Tedros.

On July 7, the Trump administration formally notified UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres. That will take back the United States From WHO on July 6, 2021.

UN members are required to give one year notice of withdrawal and pay all arrears. The United States, which has historically been the agency’s largest supporter, was valued at 22 percent of the agency’s budget, or about 120 120 million; Officials said that when the withdrawal notice was sent, it had already paid 58 58 million.

In 2019, the United States contributed approximately 3 553 million. This amount, far greater than the mandatory arrears assessment, includes voluntary donations for reasons that the US government supports.

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo on Wednesday accused the WHO of being ineffective and politically influential as he defended the Trump administration’s cancellation of a coordinated global initiative to distribute the coronavirus vaccine.

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At least 172 countries are negotiating to join the so-called CoVAX program, the only global effort by governments and manufacturers to approve and distribute a vaccine. So far, nine potential vaccines have been evaluated, and nine more are still being tested. according to who.

Cory Weinberg

About the author: Cory Weinberg

Cory Weinberg covers the intersection of tech and cities. That means digging into how startups and big tech companies are trying to reshape real estate, transportation, urban planning, and travel. Previously, he reported on Bay Area housing and commercial real estate for the San Francisco Business Times. He received a "best young journalist" award from the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

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