Covid: UK, top scientists warn of ‘critical point’ of epidemic

Covid: UK, top scientists warn of 'critical point' of epidemic

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The UK is at a “critical point” of the coronavirus epidemic and is “going in the wrong direction”, the government’s chief medical officer will warn later.

Professor Chris Witty believes the country is facing “the most challenging winter period” and will hold a television briefing at 11 a.m. BST.

This came as the Prime Minister spent the weekend in England discussing further measures.

There were 3,899 deaths and 18 deaths a day in the UK on Sunday.

The prime minister is understood to be considering a two-week mini-lockout in England – known as a “circuit breaker” – in an attempt to prevent it. Extensive growth of the virus.

He met with Prof. Whitty, Chancellor Rishi Sunak and Health Secretary Matt Hancock at Downing Street on Sunday to discuss possible measures.

On the information given later, Prof. Witty will be joined by Sir Patrick Valence, the government’s chief scientific adviser, to present the latest figures.

Prof. Witty is expected to say: “The trend in the UK is going in the wrong direction and we are at a critical point in the epidemic.

“We are looking at the statistics to see how to manage the spread of the virus before a very challenging winter period.”

Both scientists are expected to explain how the virus is spreading and the possible scenario as winter approaches.

They are also expected to share data from other countries experiencing a second wave, and to explain how the UK could cope with such situations.

Professor Chris Witty and Sir Patrick Valence were the mainstays of the Donning Street press conferences when the virus was at its peak.

So you can assume that their summary on the latest statistics will not give good news.

The two men spent Sunday afternoon behind the black door of Dr. Secretary Ning Street, posing for pictures with the health secretary, chancellor, senior officials and the prime minister himself.

What is predicted about some people within 10 that there could be a significant number of deaths a day from Covid by the end of next month until further action is taken.

The ministers agree that there should not be a complete national lockout, but tensions are mounting around the cabinet table, which should take more limited measures.

On Sunday, Mr Hancock said the disease was exacerbated “every eight or two days” with hospitalization, and further action was needed to prevent further deaths.

He warned that the country was facing a “tipping point”, As the government accepts other restrictions.

“If everyone follows the rules, we can avoid further national lockouts,” he said.

Labor leader Sir Kir Sturmer said he would support any new measures but warned that a second national lockout was becoming more likely because there was a test and trace program. In the “close collapse” situation.

London Mayor Sadiq Khan said He will meet with council leaders on Monday And then recommend to the ministers that any London-related measures be taken.

He believes the capital could be just “two or three days” behind the hotspots in the north-west and north-east of England.

Other areas of northwest England, West Yorkshire and the Midlands will face more local sanctions from Tuesday. The number of people affected by local remedies in the UK has risen to around 13.5 million.

Over the weekend, the government announced that people in England were refusing to order self-separation There could be a fine of up to 10,000 from September 28.

However, the government is facing opposition from some senior Conservative MPs who are concerned that the minister is imposing new coronavirus sanctions without informing parliament.

Coronavirus Act 2020Which became law in March, gave the government extensive powers to manage the epidemic.

But Sir Graham Brady, who represents the Tory backbenchers, said he would introduce an amendment that would require the government to come up with a new measure to get MPs to vote.

Former Supreme Court President Lady Hale, meanwhile, said Parliament had “surrendered” to ministers during the epidemic. In an article viewed by the patron

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Cory Weinberg

About the author: Cory Weinberg

Cory Weinberg covers the intersection of tech and cities. That means digging into how startups and big tech companies are trying to reshape real estate, transportation, urban planning, and travel. Previously, he reported on Bay Area housing and commercial real estate for the San Francisco Business Times. He received a "best young journalist" award from the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

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