Entrepreneurs reinforce their skills to maintain income

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Deborah Villar is a wedding decorator. Eruzia Faluba is an English teacher. Well, at least until 2020, that was their activity. This was when the Kovid-19 epidemic arrived and these professionals needed to strengthen their employment and sources of income.

Eruzia Faluba has been a teacher for over 20 years. Last year, she began working in a private school, which had fewer students due to the epidemic, and was fired. But Professor Eruzia is also a full-time cook and began working with the sale of sweets.

After more than a year of restrictive measures, Deborah Willer saw a demand for a reduction in wedding decorations. The solution to being another source of income was to leverage experience and sell breakfast baskets along with offering products and services. A treatment that has become a very popular gift option during isolation. In the last month, Deborah received 170 orders. The entrepreneur already thinks about teaching courses to share knowledge about sales.

Business management expert Ulysse Soares says that every crisis hides an opportunity. For her, the word of the moment is adaptation. For those who want to start entrepreneurship, Ulysses suggests that the worker study the skills he possesses and examine his demands for where he lives.

Intnio Pinto, Customer Relations Manager at Saber, explains that entrepreneurs see opportunities where common people see problems. In terms of quarantine, according to him, new businesses can be successful in meeting new needs and must be particularly digitally connected.

Learn to meet the needs of your community and offer innovative products and services. This can be the way for those wishing to run their own business in these challenging times.

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About the author: Sarah Gracie

Sarahis a reporter covering Amazon. She previously covered tech and transportation, and she broke stories on Uber's finances, self-driving car program, and cultural crisis. Before that, she covered cybersecurity in finance. Sarah's work has appeared in The Wall Street Journal, Bloomberg, Politico, and the Houston Chronicle.

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