FIFA announced the distribution of seats for the 2023 Women’s World Cup

Conmebol critica relatório da Fifa sobre a Colômbia

2023 World Cup will be the first tournament with 32 teams (FIFA / Press Release)

FIFA announced on Thursday (24) how it would distribute seats for the next edition of the Women’s Football World Cup to be held in Australia and New Zealand in 2023. This will be the first edition to feature 32 selections.

The first two editions of the Women’s World Cup in 1991 and 1995 were attended by 12 teams. Subsequently, the tournament was counted in 16, 1999, 2003, 2007 and 2011. There were 24 countries in the final two competitions.

With eight more teams than the previous event, there will be 29 teams in the World Cup who will directly confirm the vacant positions. The other three will leave the classified repechage.

Brazilian Women's Team Women's World Cup
Brazilian team fights for one of three places on the continent (Mariana Sa / CBF)

Direct vacancies and repetition

The following vacancies will be distributed within the continents: 11 European countries, six Asian, four African, four from North and Central America, three from South America and one from Oceania.

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The three teams eligible to participate in the World Cup will leave a group of 10 countries, which will be selected from all continents. These 10 teams will be divided into three groups, two with three countries and four with one, the leader of each group to be taken forward for decision. The division of play-offs prevents two teams in the same group from the same continent.

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In addition, this final qualifier will already be played in Australia and New Zealand and serve as a test event. Therefore, the selection of these two host countries for the 2023 World Cup will be invited to participate in the event, but only as friendly matches.

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About the author: Cory Weinberg

Cory Weinberg covers the intersection of tech and cities. That means digging into how startups and big tech companies are trying to reshape real estate, transportation, urban planning, and travel. Previously, he reported on Bay Area housing and commercial real estate for the San Francisco Business Times. He received a "best young journalist" award from the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

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