Royal Enfield Hunter 350 Spotted on Testing in India

Even after the second wave of COVID-19, Royal Enfield is working hard to fulfill its promise of releasing one bike per quarter in 2021, and the effort continues.

Recently launched in Brazil by Royal Enfield, the Meteor 350 showed that it has the qualities to please a good range of users and should soon add to this 350 family.

The Royal Enfield Hunter 350’s styling is very different, but the engine, suspension and brakes should be shared with the Meteor 350.

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Though the schedule suggests that the Royal Enfield Classic 350 will be the next model, the bike spotted under testing appears to be the Hunter 350, which is also derived from the Meteor.

Royal Enfield Meteor
The exhaust, handlebar and seat are some of the components that differ between the Hunter and the Meteor.

sharing

The bike shares components with the Meteor, but the styling and ergonomics, along with the lower handlebar and recessed crankset, show that it is a classic naked.

Royal Enfield
The rear of the bike is minimal and the flashlight and turn signal are attached to the fenders.

design

This style is evidenced by the round headlamps, drop-shaped tank and compact bench ending above the fenders, where the flashlight and turn signal assembly are attached.

Other components that are visible in the images are the cane with folding protector, double rear damping and two-wheel disc brakes with ABS.

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Equality

Like the Meteor, the Hunter should have two-channel ABS and a tripper display for step-by-step navigation through Google Maps on the panel.

Motor

Royal Enfield

The engine is the same 349 cm single cylinder from the Meteor that produces 20.5 hp and 2. kgf.m of maximum power and torque.

It remains to be seen whether the Hunter’s performance will be equal to or better than the Meteor, with the question of whether the bike’s weight can help.

About the author: Cory Weinberg

Cory Weinberg covers the intersection of tech and cities. That means digging into how startups and big tech companies are trying to reshape real estate, transportation, urban planning, and travel. Previously, he reported on Bay Area housing and commercial real estate for the San Francisco Business Times. He received a "best young journalist" award from the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

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