SpaceX launch of first South Korean armed service satellite delayed

SpaceX launch of first South Korean military satellite delayed

The Falcon 9 booster for the Anasis-II mission is a history-building rocket. It was the booster used to supply NASA astronauts to the ISS in Might.


SpaceX

SpaceX has postponed a Falcon 9 launch three moments in the span of five times, with the most recent delay impacting the Anasis-II mission to deliver a South Korean navy satellite to orbit. The organization tweeted Monday that it was pushing back again blast-off “to consider a nearer glimpse at the next stage, swap components if required.”

SpaceX also postponed its most recent Starlink start past Wednesday and then again on Saturday.

The Anasis-II mission will finally lift off from Cape Canaveral Air Power Station in Florida. If it comes about ahead of the Starlink mission, which is presently awaiting a new launch day, it will be SpaceX’s 12th launch this 12 months, the 90th flight of a Falcon 9 and the second over-all for this individual booster, which was to start with flown in May to produce NASA astronauts Doug Hurley and Bob Behnken to the International Place Station — the first time a industrial organization has done so. Ergo, it is really received some history.

There is a backup launch window scheduled for the exact same time on July 15, but we will have to hold out and see how rapidly the technical challenges can be worked out. 

The payload, Anasis-II, is South Korea’s first army communications satellite. Due to the fact of its use in the armed service, there is certainly not a large amount of information and facts about Anasis-II, but for the truth it is based off the Eurostar E3000 satellite bus, in accordance to the Everyday Astronaut

We are going to update this submit as soon as we have a new launch day. 


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Cory Weinberg

About the author: Cory Weinberg

Cory Weinberg covers the intersection of tech and cities. That means digging into how startups and big tech companies are trying to reshape real estate, transportation, urban planning, and travel. Previously, he reported on Bay Area housing and commercial real estate for the San Francisco Business Times. He received a "best young journalist" award from the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

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