The LNP cites Queensland election fundraising programs overseen by leader Deb Fricklington.

In the weeks leading up to the Queensland election, the Liberal National Party has raised concerns with the Election Commission about a series of personal fundraising campaigns featuring its leader, Deb Fricklington.

ABC reported Tuesday that the party was Issued an internal “show cause” notice Related to five special political events attended by Fricklington, Leader of the Opposition, wealthy party donors and property developers.

In addition to Franklington, a number of events featuring Peter Dutton, the Federal Secretary of the Interior, were also promoted.

Property developers are barred from making political contributions in Queensland and there is no suggestion that the LNP has agreed to raise funds from donors who have been banned from these events, or more.

However, the party later referred its concerns about those private programs to the Queensland Election Commission and warned party members that the presence of banned donors at political events in the run-up to state elections was “very difficult”.

In a statement issued after ABC’s story was published, the LNP said it did not refer Franklington specifically to the Election Commission.

“ABC’s allegation that the LNP sent Deb Fricklington to the ECQ is false. That did not happen, “said a party spokesperson. “The LNP communicates regularly with the ECQ to ensure that we comply with the Act.”

Speaking to reporters after halting an election campaign on Tuesday, Fricklington said the party had not accepted money from any banned donors.

“Politicians attend dinner of supporters, politicians go to events with all kinds of business people. “Anyone can join a fundraiser, but a prohibited donor cannot donate.” And let’s make it really clear that I stand by my consistency.

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“There are many cases where the party has advised me to write to the ECQ for advice [about], And there’s nothing wrong with that. I stand by my integrity. ”

The Fricklington office openly denied that it had organized fundraising events.

The Guardian Australia understands from party sources that the LNP headquarters did not hold events. Sources said the party’s contact with the ECQ was not made as a request to investigate Fricklington’s actions, but to conduct a “triple investigation” into whether the funds were properly raised without approval.

“But her name is on the flyers and she joined the dinner [the party would] Knowing that to distance yourself from it, they [the ECQ] It would be a logical conclusion to look at Deb’s actions, “said an LNP statistician.

“Whether something went wrong or not, it says something about the relationship between Deb and the headquarters and the state of our campaign.”

The developers involved in the fundraisers told ABC that they had not paid for attendance or any donations, and were aware of the rules that prohibited them from doing so.

There are significant internal and factional movements within the LNP, including concerns about its fundraising.

In August, the party’s honorary treasurer, Stuart Fraser, stepped down.

The Guardian Australia believes his resignation was not linked to Fricklington’s fundraising concerns. But the situation Leaving the LNP headquarters without a chief party fundraiser A few months before the October 31 election.

Some within the party were concerned that the LNP was already at a disadvantage in raising funds, claiming that development donations and new spending units would allow unions to run third-party campaigns and take advantage of labor.

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The party figures show that the events appear to have taken place soon after the impressive backroom figures – which are internally called “cables” – Tried to change him as the leader of the state.

“Deb has been close to Cable, and it’s clear the relationship is broken. I’m disappointed that, less than three weeks before the election, we can’t close it and move on. “

The Fricklington office told ABC: “Anyone who donates to the party must declare that they are not banned donors.

“There is transparency about who has donated and who has not.”

Cory Weinberg

About the author: Cory Weinberg

Cory Weinberg covers the intersection of tech and cities. That means digging into how startups and big tech companies are trying to reshape real estate, transportation, urban planning, and travel. Previously, he reported on Bay Area housing and commercial real estate for the San Francisco Business Times. He received a "best young journalist" award from the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

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