UK wants Apple TV+ and others to comply with its laws – MacMagazine.com.br

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video streaming services such as Apple TV+, Netflix I Disney+ They are within sight of the British government to comply with the same broadcasting laws that traditional British broadcasters such as BBC, ITV, Sky and others face in the country.

Minister of Digital, Culture, Media and Sports Department announced this possibility today – which would further level the competition between foreign streaming services and national broadcast networks.

Traditional broadcasters must follow the regulator’s code Ofcom, which has restrictions that cover topics such as harm, crime, accuracy and fairness.

If the rules are not respected, Ofcom may issue fines and suspend your license. Currently, the only streaming service that follows the rules is BBC iPlayer, from BBC – a company based in England. However, it was not informed how Ofcom would have jurisdiction to act on international services.

According to ministers, almost 20 years have passed since the regulatory framework for the UK transmission sector was introduced in the 2003 Communications Act (Communications Act 2003), which was designed before the emergence of video streaming services.

Culture Secretary Oliver Dowden said during the announcement, “Technology has changed the way we broadcast, but the rules that protect viewers and help our traditional channels compete with them come from an analog era.” Huh.”

According to a press release, a review of the rules will examine whether they need to be tightened to ensure fair age ratings for all streaming services and whether they should be subject to fairness and accuracy standards. The review will be used to produce a guide – which can lead to similarities between streaming services and local broadcast networks.

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We will continue to monitor the situation…

Via MacRumors

Cory Weinberg

About the author: Cory Weinberg

Cory Weinberg covers the intersection of tech and cities. That means digging into how startups and big tech companies are trying to reshape real estate, transportation, urban planning, and travel. Previously, he reported on Bay Area housing and commercial real estate for the San Francisco Business Times. He received a "best young journalist" award from the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

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