US asks G20 to help poor countries buy vaccines – 25/02/2021

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Washington, February 25, 2021 (AFP) – The United States on Thursday (25) asked the G20 countries to increase aid to poor countries to improve access to the coronovirus vaccine to stimulate the world economy.

In an email sent to his colleagues on the sidelines of the G20 virtual meeting, US Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen stated that her country is committed to an effective and comprehensive vaccination campaign for its population, but asks countries to go beyond their borders Urged.

“I urge countries to increase their aid,” said Yellen, who said that “a rapid vaccination program that is truly global will be the strongest stimulus that can be given to the world economy.”

Worldwide, the vaccination process is uneven and there is doubt about the supply of vaccines. On Wednesday, the deputy director of the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO), Jarbus Barbosa, called the declaration of vaccines against Kovid-19 a “global public good”.

The Treasury Secretary argued that “without access to vaccines, many low-income countries would suffer a tragic loss of life and unnecessarily delay their recovery”.

In his letter, Yellen argued that the G20 countries should currently stick to large-scale economic stimulus schemes and avoid withdrawing aid soon.

The Secretary also said that the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and the World Bank should remain the main actors to overcome the economic crisis created by the epidemic.

Yellen argued that without further international action to support low-income countries, there is a danger of a dangerous and permanent divergence in the global economy and said that entities such as the IMF and the World Bank should play a role in financing. Feedback. global health “.

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Sarah Gracie

About the author: Sarah Gracie

Sarahis a reporter covering Amazon. She previously covered tech and transportation, and she broke stories on Uber's finances, self-driving car program, and cultural crisis. Before that, she covered cybersecurity in finance. Sarah's work has appeared in The Wall Street Journal, Bloomberg, Politico, and the Houston Chronicle.

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