WTTC asks UK to remove ‘amber’ color from traffic light system – Publishuris

WTTC asks UK to remove 'amber' color from traffic light system - Publishuris

The World Travel and Tourism Council (WTTC) has called on the UK government to abandon the messy and harmful traffic light system and replace it with a simple and easy-to-understand list of green and red countries.

The WTTC, which represents the global private travel and tourism sector, says the move will, one at a time, simplify a system that has been “relentlessly discredited in recent months.”
The WTTC argues that the current scheme, apart from affecting consumer confidence in travel, also affects the balance of tourism companies.

WTTC Senior Vice President and Interim CEO Virginia Messina stressed that it is time for “the government to remove the ambiguity, abandon the messy and harmful traffic light system and replace it with a simpler system of green and red categories and clear rules.” Give vaccinated and uninfected”.

“The UK must now open its doors not only to travelers from the US and the EU, but also to visitors from around the world, demonstrating that they are open for business and to welcome all travellers safely,” the official said. are ready,” the official said. ..

The WTTC also says the British government needs to significantly expand the green list so that fully vaccinated UK citizens have the right to travel safely around the world and welcome leisure or business travellers.

The Global Tourism Organization also recommends that there be coordination and reciprocity with other countries, so that regulations are applied equitably and fairly to ensure maximum ease of international mobility for travellers.

For the WTTC, “the coordination will restore international mobility, ease protocols for vaccination travellers, highlight the importance of global recognition of the vaccine, as well as the adoption of a ‘digital health pass'”.

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About the author: Cory Weinberg

Cory Weinberg covers the intersection of tech and cities. That means digging into how startups and big tech companies are trying to reshape real estate, transportation, urban planning, and travel. Previously, he reported on Bay Area housing and commercial real estate for the San Francisco Business Times. He received a "best young journalist" award from the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

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