Brazil ‘rescued’ against Zambia and captured Canada on Wednesday

Bia Zaneratto disputa bola com Hazel Nali, goleira de Zâmbia
Bea Zanerato brawls ball with Zambian goalkeeper Hazel Nalik
Photo: Martin Mejia – 27.Jul.2021/ep

Brazil beat Zambia 1-0 in Saitama this Tuesday morning (27), and finished the first leg of the women’s football tournament at the 2020 Olympics with 7 points and second in Group F. The only goal of the match was marked by andressa alves, his second in the competition.

With the result, Canada would finish second in Group E, as rivals in the quarter-finals to Brazil. If they advance, the crosses will be placed on the Brazilians, in the semi-finals, clashing with the United States or the Netherlands.

The defining move of the duel at Saitama happened in just 11 minutes in the first half. Mvemba fouled Ludmila, who hit goalkeeper Hazel in the fall. The Zambian defender was sent off, and the goalkeeper had to leave the game, injured. In the free kick, Andressa Alves scored for the Brazilian. With one low, a cold goalkeeper and an open scoreboard, Zambia’s game was compromised.

Controlling the match and without requiring much effort, Piya Sundhej’s picks came in handy to mix up the normal starting lineup with reserves, show serve and get minutes into the team. Lele, Poliana, Zukinara, Angelina, Andressa and Lyudmila were the newcomers. At the age of 25, Giovanna entered Bia’s vacancy, injuring her face. Hence the seven changes.

However, the changes weren’t enough to set the game on fire. In contrast, the Brazilian rhythm was slow and uninterrupted. Due to the natural pace of the match or the malicious calculation of crossings in the final leg, 1×0 remained inactive in the first half. Marta and Formiga did not return for the second half.

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Netherlands won, United States tie

Netherlands played at full strength and overtook China: 8×2
Photo: Kiichiro Sato –27.jul.2021 / AP

In the second game of the group, the Netherlands entered half-time after beating China 3×1, which resulted in an increase in the Orange team’s goal difference and the team’s lead in the first leg.

As the top two thirds qualified, defeats by the Chinese and Zambia saw Australia and Japan advance to the quarter-finals, placing third among the other groups.

Earlier, at 5 in the morning, America and Australia were face to face. The Oceania team needed a victory to pass without risk, and the Americans acted with humility and caution. After some scares in the first leg, the United States controlled their opponents well in the second half, which did not go out 0x0.

In the second game of the group, Sweden went 100% in the tournament, beating New Zealand 2–0, in another solid performance, and guaranteed themselves in the first.

now canadian

Canada was part of Great Britain and will face Brazil in the next leg
Photo: Kiichiro Sato –27.jul.2021 / AP

Canada and Great Britain were tied 1-1 by Group E at 8 a.m. The British team, already better on the field, greatly increased their performance level when Canadian Lyon opened the score on 10 of the second half in a rare dangerous move from his side.

It was the leadership of the group that was at stake. Weir, tied at 40 in the final leg, guaranteed the British first place and played Canada to a clash with Brazil.

In the second match of the group, Japan needed only a draw against Chile to finish third, and played a safe game. The 1-0 win came with a late and well-deserved goal, scored by the 32-year-old Tanaka in the second half.

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While Brazil spent time without ambition in Saitama and the Netherlands scored an impressive 8–2 in China, the tournament received its fixed format for the knockout stage with all matches scheduled for Friday (30):

  • Canada x Brazil (5:00 a.m. Brasilia time)
  • Great Britain x Australia (6am)
  • Sweden x Japan (7am)
  • Netherlands x United States (8am)

About the author: Cory Weinberg

Cory Weinberg covers the intersection of tech and cities. That means digging into how startups and big tech companies are trying to reshape real estate, transportation, urban planning, and travel. Previously, he reported on Bay Area housing and commercial real estate for the San Francisco Business Times. He received a "best young journalist" award from the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

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