Britain cuts aid to developing countries

Photo: AFP

The British Parliament formally approved the proposal of Prime Minister Boris

Johnson from cutting foreign aid to foreign countries. United Kingdom

Intends to reduce the amount of financing abroad

Growth from 0.7% to 0.5% of Gross National Income, which should be lower

Four billion pounds sterling (about R$28.6 billion).

The bill was officially approved by 333 delegates, while 298 voted

against. The government’s measure was harshly criticized, including predecessors

Johnson, Theresa May, for not providing deputies an opportunity to confirm

New share of expenses. Incidentally, former British Prime Minister and Conservative Party leader

From 2016 to 2019, he voted against his party for the first time. May remarked that the Kingdom

United broke its commitment to the poor around the world.

The government’s proposal was also criticized by all former British ministers and for this

Easy for opposition MPs to take measures, British Treasury Minister Rishi

Sunak said the cut would be temporary. However, as the measure was brought

legislative changes, to return it to the old level, would require that in the future

There is another approval by Parliament, which many doubt.

The UK is one of the world’s wealthiest and most industrialized countries, a member of the G7,

And subsidy policies for developing countries have always played a part.

strong role in their foreign affairs, especially as a constituent of their

international reputation. In addition to having a certain global impact,

The British state needed to implement the so called soft power policy. for analysts

This tendency to reduce the budget for international aid is worth noting.

both in the Conservative Party and across the country, which some believe

The possible consequences of this decision could affect a reduction in the role of the state.

Kingdom no world.

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Cory Weinberg

About the author: Cory Weinberg

Cory Weinberg covers the intersection of tech and cities. That means digging into how startups and big tech companies are trying to reshape real estate, transportation, urban planning, and travel. Previously, he reported on Bay Area housing and commercial real estate for the San Francisco Business Times. He received a "best young journalist" award from the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

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