Computer Harper murder trial: Court hears quad bike owner’s 999 get in touch with

PC Harper murder trial: Court hears quad bike owner's 999 call

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Thames Valley Law enforcement

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Computer system Andrew Harper died after his ankles turned lassoed in a strap hooked up to a car

The trial of 3 guys accused of murdering a law enforcement officer has been played a 999 connect with made by a person who noticed them thieving his quad bicycle.

Peter Wallis advised the phone handler he could see “masked males” brandishing weapons exterior his Berkshire household.

Personal computer Andrew Harper was dragged to his loss of life when his feet bought caught in a rope utilised to tow the bicycle away.

Driver Henry Extensive, 19, denies murder, alongside with his two passengers Albert Bowers and Jessie Cole, equally 18.

In the recording played in court, Mr Wallis said: “I’ve received 4 masked gentlemen outside my house and they’ve bought weapons.

“They arrived spherical earlier and now they are at my residence.”

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Media captionPeter Wallis says he can see “4 masked men” brandishing weapons

The courtroom earlier listened to that, all through the day of 15 August, a team of adult men with their faces lined had approached Mr Wallis’s house near Bradfield Southend. He confronted them and they left but returned later that night.

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Fb

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The prosecution said it was “irrelevant” whether or not Henry Extensive, Albert Bowers, and Jessie Cole (l-r) wished Personal computer Harper to grow to be caught in the strap

All through the 999 contact manufactured at 23:17 BST, Mr Wallis said he believed the gentlemen had been breaking into his garage, prior to indicating they had been stealing the bicycle parked exterior.

Mr Wallis then advised the contact handler the men were being “dragging” the £10,000 quad bike up the highway.

The simply call handler advised him the law enforcement had “plenty of units on their way” and that a “silent strategy” would be manufactured to avoid alerting the intruders to the pursuit.

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Julia Quenzler

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Henry Long and his passengers, Albert Bowers and Jessie Cole, (l-r) deny murder

The courtroom earlier read Computer system Harper, 28, from Wallingford, Oxfordshire, died in “actually shocking circumstances” when his ankles had been “lassoed” by the rope utilised to tow the quad bike.

Supplying proof, Computer system Andrew Shaw explained observing his colleague, identified as Harps, falling to the floor “like a waterskier”.

“Toes whipped ahead and you land on your back again – that is how Harps fell,” he reported.

“I assumed perhaps he slipped on a thing.

“I just knew he was in hassle.”

‘I’ve shed him’

Laptop Shaw informed jurors he established off in the auto following losing sight of his colleague, and found his stab vest further more down the lane.

He then uncovered that an additional officer had noted a “body in the road” near the A4.

Dashcam footage played to the jury confirmed the moment Pc Shaw radioed colleagues about Pc Harper to say he experienced “lost him”.

Prosecutor Jonathan Laidlaw QC reported: “What then follows, you depart the car or truck and experienced the gruesome discovery that body is your colleague.

“You obviously did your most effective to attend to Computer Harper. It can be obvious he has a catastrophic collection of accidents and you will find almost nothing that can be done for him.”

Laptop Shaw replied quietly: “No.”

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Empics

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Personal computer Andrew Shaw (front) in comparison Pc Harper’s tumble to h2o-skiing, ft “whipped ahead and you land on your back”

Mr Extensive, from Mortimer, Studying, has pleaded guilty to manslaughter but, along with Mr Bowers and Mr Cole, denies murder.

Mr Cole, of Paices Hill close to Reading, Mr Bowers, of Moat Near, Bramley, and Mr Extended have all pleaded responsible to conspiracy to steal a quad bike.

The trial carries on.

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About the author: Cory Weinberg

Cory Weinberg covers the intersection of tech and cities. That means digging into how startups and big tech companies are trying to reshape real estate, transportation, urban planning, and travel. Previously, he reported on Bay Area housing and commercial real estate for the San Francisco Business Times. He received a "best young journalist" award from the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

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