Coronavirus: future German minister advises to avoid Christmas trips – poca Negócios

Coronavirus: future German minister advises to avoid Christmas trips - poca Negócios

The German authority recommends staying home for Christmas (Photo: Picture Alliance/Getty Images)

Germany’s future transport minister appointed in the new government of the next chancellor Olaf Scholzo, Volker Wissing told the newspaper This Sunday, 5 sunday photo That, “in the current situation, it is prudent to spend Christmas with a small group at home and not plan large trips across the country.”

As the Associated Press reports, “the winter of 2021 will be more dramatic than the winter of 2020.” Scholz and his team are expected to take over the administration of the country on Wednesday, pending the signing of a coalition agreement and parliamentary majority support for Scholz.

German federal and state leaders announced Thursday, mainly new restrictions for unaffiliated people, such as a ban on entry into shops, restaurants and sporting and cultural venues considered non-essential. Parliament is also considering setting up a general mandate for vaccination.

About 68.9% of Germans have been fully vaccinated against COVID-19, well short of the government’s target of at least 75%. The slowdown in the increase in new cases in recent weeks was cited as a major factor.

On Sunday, the German National Center for Disease Control reported 42,055 new cases. 94 more deaths within 24 hours bringing the total to 103,040 confirmed deaths during the pandemic in Germany.

In Japan, Kyodo News reported that the government would try to shorten the interval between the second and third doses of the vaccine “whenever possible”, according to a statement on Sunday by the chief cabinet secretary of the Seiji Kihara government. With Fuji TV Shows.

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The country’s administration initially established a period of at least eight months after the second dose for a booster dose; Then in exceptional cases the period was reduced to six months. He later revised the policy to “eight months in principle”, causing confusion among local governments.

Kihara said the Japanese government is working with local governments to reduce the interval “based on their ability” to at least six months to approve Moderna’s vaccine for use as a booster. Can you Japan began giving its third dose of vaccinations from Pfizer and BioNTech last Wednesday to healthcare professionals who received a second dose eight months or more ago. Pfizer’s vaccine is currently the only vaccine approved for a booster in Japan.

South Korea on Sunday reported three more cases of the micron coronavirus variant, taking its total to 12, according to the Korean Agency for Disease Control and Prevention (KDCA). On Saturday 4, 5,128 new cases of Kovid-19 were reported. There have been a total of 473,034 cases and 3,852 deaths in the country.

Starting this Monday, 6, people visiting 14 designated public places, including places of entertainment, must show proof of vaccination while the government defines a plan to reduce the risk of community spread.

In the United States, ten people aboard a Norwegian Cruise Line ship near New Orleans tested positive for COVID-19, officials reported Saturday night. The Associated Press reported based on a statement from the Louisiana Department of Health that the ship departed New Orleans on November 28 and will return later this week.

Last week, the ship made stops in Belize, Honduras and Mexico, carrying more than 3,200 people aboard. According to the statement, Norwegian has “followed appropriate quarantine and isolation protocols as new cases and risks have been identified on the ship.”

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Before landing in New Orleans, each person will be tested and those who test positive will either go directly home or return to accommodation provided by the cruise company.

About the author: Sarah Gracie

Sarahis a reporter covering Amazon. She previously covered tech and transportation, and she broke stories on Uber's finances, self-driving car program, and cultural crisis. Before that, she covered cybersecurity in finance. Sarah's work has appeared in The Wall Street Journal, Bloomberg, Politico, and the Houston Chronicle.

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