Counting of votes begins on the creation of the first Amazon syndicate in the United States – 03/30/2021

US trade deficit widens to $ 68.1 billion in November - 01/07/2021

San Francisco, March 31, 2021 (AFP) – Counting of votes cast by workers at an Amazon facility in Alabama began Tuesday (30) and will depend on the outcome of the company’s first union creation in the United States.

The investigation is expected to take several days due to potential challenges and Amazon has warned that it will try to prevent the formation of unions in its operations.

A spokesperson for the online commerce giant told AFP, “We ask all our employees to vote and their voices are heard in the coming days.”

“Our employees know the reality: starting a salary of $ 15 an hour or more, health insurance from day one and a safe and inclusive workplace,” he said.

The counting of votes, which began to be sent by mail on February 8, will be held behind closed doors and under the supervision of the US Labor Relations Agency.

Pledges can be fought for a variety of reasons, such as a misplaced signature or an incorrect job description in a company.

If approved by a majority, the union would represent 5,800 employees in the sorting and packaging unit in Bessemer, Alabama.

If formed, the association could pave the way for other Amazon facilities and others to be built at other companies as well.

Union and political leaders claim that Amazon employees work under constant pressure, minimal labor protection, and insist that they need to negotiate collectively.

Amazon, which is the second largest employer in the United States with 800,000 workers, says its employees do not need a union and have already paid them more than many other companies.

READ  European stock markets gave cards with a boost to tourism. Fed in a minute - high interest in US before markets

juj-gc / to / gm / yo / jc / mvv

Amazon.Com

Sarah Gracie

About the author: Sarah Gracie

Sarahis a reporter covering Amazon. She previously covered tech and transportation, and she broke stories on Uber's finances, self-driving car program, and cultural crisis. Before that, she covered cybersecurity in finance. Sarah's work has appeared in The Wall Street Journal, Bloomberg, Politico, and the Houston Chronicle.

Related Posts

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *