Guardiola refuses to abandon players of national teams if he has to follow quarantine

Guardiola refuses to abandon players of national teams if he has to follow quarantine

Manchester City coach Joseph Guardiola endorsed Liverpool coach Jurgen Klopp’s position and believed “it makes no sense” to hand over players for national team matches in the March window if they return to the United Kingdom. Quarantine is to be followed.

Individuals joining the “Red List” countries in Britain, including Brazil and Argentina, for example, must spend ten days in a hotel in isolation, according to the rules in force. “I think players have to separate themselves for ten days when they travel with their national teams and then return,” Guardiola said on Friday.

“We worked hard for seven, eight or nine months. After the date comes the deciding part of the FIFA (official match period for national teams) season, and if not the important players, maybe six, seven, eight or nine players. Can play. He said that for ten days it makes no sense.

Some countries have re-enforced their commitments to circumvent the sanctions. Portugal announced that it had a duel against Azerbaijan through a qualifier for the World Cup in Turkey (Italy), while Norway would play against Turkey in Malaga (Spain).

The biggest problems are with the South American qualifier matches. In early February, FIFA called for easing the rule on players’ work until at least the end of April, a measure launched in August 2020, as an effect of the Kovid-19 epidemic.

Clubs are generally required to allow their players to participate in the Games for their selection on the dates fixed by FIFA. The relaxation of the rule allows them to take into account travel restrictions related to quarantine measures or epidemics.

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Sarah Gracie

About the author: Sarah Gracie

Sarahis a reporter covering Amazon. She previously covered tech and transportation, and she broke stories on Uber's finances, self-driving car program, and cultural crisis. Before that, she covered cybersecurity in finance. Sarah's work has appeared in The Wall Street Journal, Bloomberg, Politico, and the Houston Chronicle.

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