In fight against prejudice, Hamilton now seeks inclusion and diversity outside sport

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Accustomed to breaking records in Formula 1, Lewis Hamilton now wants to break barriers off the track. And not just in the sports world. In her fight against racial prejudice, the seven-time world champion works to encourage inclusion, equality and diversity in schools. But he has already warned that he may go further, yet without giving any clue about his next endeavors.

“It’s not just the education system that has constraints. There are systemic issues, and not only in the United Kingdom. There are in Brazil too. There’s a huge black population here”, says Se Pilot. mercedes, in an interview conducted on Brazilian soil, where he will dispute the So Paulo GP at the Autodromo de Interlagos later this week.

To break down these systemic barriers, Hamilton intends to encourage representation. “Any young person on the planet deserves the same right to get a great education. Families shouldn’t consider careers for their kids like, ‘Well, this career doesn’t work for my kid because in this field There is no way to come… that looks like ours in this area. So, representation is a very important achievement.”

Mercedes drivers have begun to gain attention in recent years with off-track initiatives. Having supported sustainability and environmental issues, Hamilton leveraged in the wake of the “Black Lives Matter” movement to take a stand on racism, a topic he is closely aware of for being the only black driver in F-1 history. .

In 2020, it made hamilton commission, with the support of his team Mercedes in F-1 to encourage diversity in motorsport. This year, the British decided to delve into the subject. he founded mission 44 In partnership with educational charity foundations to train professionals and engage black people teach first, The project aims to train 150 black teachers to teach science, technology, engineering and maths subjects over the next two years in poor communities in England.

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“Mission 44 aims to analyze these systemic issues and see how we can encourage people to work on them and create equality,” explains Pilot. “And the first step we took with the focus on the UK was to launch the program with Teach First, which focused on black teachers because representation is so low.”

In another initiative, Hamilton formed a team called kindled, to act normally engaged in sports. “We hope to create a pool of talent. We want to find new places to recruit youth from different castes to enter the sport.”

Without giving details, the 36-year-old athlete plans to take these ideals to other areas. “This should be a concern, not just for our business, but for everyone. We try to make our game more inclusive, which can reflect the face of the planet. Inclusion is an important part. But Excited to see the changes in the coming years.”

With the knowledge of the facts, the English star calmly assumes the role of “ambassador” of these social causes. “I like to see it as a privilege. When I started out in the sport, I always tried to understand what my purpose in life was. For a long time I was the only black driver. I achieved so much success And I work with Mercedes to try to understand what that means and what I’m going to do. Many of our partners are focusing on the issue of inclusion. And that’s strengthened our partnership. “

Hamilton is depicted as his greatest idol in his social performances. Ayrton Senna Institute is recognized for its work in the field of education. “I remember Ayrton’s first win here and admire how he embodied the spirit of Brazil. It’s my dream: to help mobilize and influence people in a positive way, as Ayrton did. I Haven’t reached this level in England yet, but I know I already have good support there.”

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About the author: Sarah Gracie

Sarahis a reporter covering Amazon. She previously covered tech and transportation, and she broke stories on Uber's finances, self-driving car program, and cultural crisis. Before that, she covered cybersecurity in finance. Sarah's work has appeared in The Wall Street Journal, Bloomberg, Politico, and the Houston Chronicle.

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