Leighton Buzzard affected by third earthquake in two weeks

An earthquake shook the town of Bedfordshire – the third in two weeks.

The British Geological Survey (BGS) said the 3.0 magnitude quake was centered on Leythan Buzzard.

It came just weeks after a magnitude 3.5 earthquake shook the city on September 8.

Another quake, which struck at 11.20 pm on Sunday, September 13, struck BGS. Measured 2.1.

It is believed to have been the aftermath of the September 8 quake.

According to the BGS, the latest quake was about six miles deep and slightly north of the city.

The European-Mediterranean Seismological Center (EMSC), an independent scientific organization, said the quake was reported near the village of Hertfordshire in Trincomalee, measuring 3.1 on the Richter scale and slightly to the south.

According to the BGS, the quake struck around 8.30am this morning, although Twitter users in Leighton Buzzard felt the tremor shortly before 9.30am.

One said: ‘Was this another earthquake in the Layton Buzzard? Does anyone else feel that way? ‘

An earthquake shook the town of Bedfordshire – the third in two weeks. The British Geological Survey (BGS) says it happened around Layton Buzzard, while a map by the European-Mediterranean Seismological Center (EMSC) shows it near Hemel Hempstead.

The British Geological Survey (BGS) said the 3.0 magnitude quake was centered on Leythan Buzzard. Image: A map showing how residents must have felt in the area around the quake

The British Geological Survey (BGS) said the 3.0 magnitude quake was centered on Leythan Buzzard. Image: A map showing how residents must have felt in the area around the quake

The Independent Scientific Organization, EMSC, reported the quake measuring about 3.6 on the Richter scale and a little southwest, near the village of Tring.

The Independent Scientific Organization, EMSC, reported the quake measuring about 3.6 on the Richter scale and a little southwest, near the village of Tring.

Recent Earthquake The third earthquake in the last two weeks has been felt in Leythan Buzzard (pictured).

Recent Earthquake The third earthquake in the last two weeks has been felt in Leythan Buzzard (pictured).

A tweet posted by BGS this morning said: “We are receiving reports of an earthquake in the Lighton Buzzard area this morning.

“We are currently investigating and will update you as soon as possible.”

In a follow-up tweet, BGS said: ‘We are receiving reports of earthquakes following the previous events of 3.5 and 2.1 magnitude on September 8 and 13 in the same area.

‘Reports say’ only lasted a few seconds’ and ‘felt the same shock, like getting into a car that had an emergency stop!’ ‘

Dina Gower, a Twitter user, said: ‘Feel it in the Latin Buzzard at 9:34 am – the house shook and the windows slammed but were not so strong on September 8.

Another, James Emm, said: ‘Our house shook for a moment at about 9.34am in Linsled / Layton Buzzard.

‘It felt like a lot more shaking than the first blast, which felt like an explosion.

“Will the day get a little weaker or not at the top of the center this time as much as this time?” ‘

Another, Joe Regalt, added: “The Conservatory has gone awry and the same ‘explosion’ sounds like the September 8 incident but not so loud.”

B.G.S. The epicenter was reported below the ground, however; no tsunami alert was issued. Mirror Online Online.

The second Layton Bazard quake earlier this month was thought to be the aftershock of a magnitude 3.5 earthquake on September 8. Picture: A map showing an earthquake earlier this month

The second Layton Bazard quake earlier this month was thought to be the aftershock of a magnitude 3.5 earthquake on September 8. Picture: A map showing an earthquake earlier this month

If this is the case, it could be similar to a series of 34 earthquakes known as the ‘Surrey herd’, which occurred between April 2018 and May 2019.

At the time, neighbors blamed oil wells at Horse Hill and Brockham, a few miles away.

However, a study by Imperial College London, University of Bristol and the British Geological Survey (BGS) concluded that the quakes were natural.

“What we’re seeing here is a small shock from that earthquake (September 8),” said Glenn Ford, a BGS seismologist.

Mr Ford said it was “normal behavior” that had been seen “many times” in different parts of the UK.

He added: “Obviously there is some tension in that particular area and we have had an initial earthquake.

“It’s probably still balancing stress in that part of the world, and we’re getting these little shocks.

‘Maybe it will be resolved soon but can we get another one? We could, but we don’t know when. ‘

How are Earth’s scales measured?

The magnitude of the earthquakes, or the magnitude and intensity of the shock waves they produce, is known as seismic waves.

The magnitude of an earthquake is different from its magnitude.

The magnitude of the earthquake indicates the amount of energy released where the earthquake occurred.

The magnitude is calculated based on the measurements on the seasonographs.

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The magnitude of the earthquake is an indication of how strong the vibration is.

At 10:30 a.m. Thursday, a magnitude 5.3 earthquake shook the Channel Islands off the coast of Southern California.

At 10:30 a.m. Thursday, a magnitude 5.3 earthquake shook the Channel Islands off the coast of Southern California.

Accordingly United States Geological Survey“Intensity is determined by the impact on people, human structures and the natural environment.”

Earthquakes occur below the earth’s surface in an area called the hypocenter.

During an earthquake, one part of an earthquake remains stationary and one part moves along the earth’s surface.

Earthquakes are then measured by the difference in position between the stationary and moving parts of the earthquake.

Cory Weinberg

About the author: Cory Weinberg

Cory Weinberg covers the intersection of tech and cities. That means digging into how startups and big tech companies are trying to reshape real estate, transportation, urban planning, and travel. Previously, he reported on Bay Area housing and commercial real estate for the San Francisco Business Times. He received a "best young journalist" award from the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

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