Northern lights are visible south of Virginia

Northern lights are visible south of Virginia

Harrisonburg, WA (WHSV) –

Update: Estimated time has now changed to Thursday after sunset. Space weather forecasting is very different from weather forecasting on the surface. There may still be some changes with the arrival of this solar storm.

Maybe you can save some time to watch the next night. Northern lights can be seen south of Pennsylvania, and in many cases, perhaps even in the Mid-Atlantic.

A coronal mass disturbance (CME) moves into the Earth’s atmosphere sometime on Wednesday or Thursday, according to the NOAA’s Space Weather Agency. CMEs are large clusters of plasma and magnetic fields from the sun’s corona. Once the Earth’s environment is affected, they spread and can often form Northern Lights or Aurora Borealis.

Although it is a solar solar storm, it needs to be a little stronger for the northern lights to be visible in the far south.

This is what it should take

  • Will need hit hit to kill the environment at night. If it happens during the day, we don’t see it.
  • The Observe Reza must be strong enough to see the southern lights far enough to look very carefully here.
  • You will need to move to a very dark place away from the city lights.
  • Be sure to get a good view of the northern distance.

In general, taking photos of them has better results than with the naked eye because you can use longer exposure.

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A local astronomer, Jason Rinehart, captured the Northern Lights on camera in June 2015, looking down at Buchanan Ta looking along the Blue Ridge Parkway. In 2015 he was the 4th Geomagnetic Storm. The current one is C3.

It would be rare to see them locally, but it has happened before. Don’t set your expectations too high, but then again, it’s fun to go out and do some stargazing while you’re at it.

When to see

The best time to watch would be after sunset on Thursday. However, we will have a better idea of ​​the time as the Earth approaches the Earth.

Copyright 2020 WDBJ. all rights reserved.

Cory Weinberg

About the author: Cory Weinberg

Cory Weinberg covers the intersection of tech and cities. That means digging into how startups and big tech companies are trying to reshape real estate, transportation, urban planning, and travel. Previously, he reported on Bay Area housing and commercial real estate for the San Francisco Business Times. He received a "best young journalist" award from the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

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