Patrick Mormon reviews Apollo 13 – the dark side of the moon

Apollo 13: The Dark Side of the Moon (originaltheatreonline.com)

Rating:

Description: A huge leap for a theater

39 steps (Malting Theater, St. Albans)

Rating:

Description: 39 steps in the right direction

Houston, we have a problem. ‘It was a short sentence for the man; But a major hurdle in mission control was when the Apollo 13 spacecraft to the moon was rocked by an explosion 50 years ago.

The story has since been turned into a Tom Hanks starrer, but is now being retold by Torben Bates in a play-themed play by an extraordinarily enterprising original theater.

While other theater companies have closed shops in front of Covid, the original theater has sought out new frontiers and boldly moved on where no previous trip has taken place.

Apollo 13, however, is the third online show of the Original Theater Epidemic; Self-financing and large-scale filming in actors' homes and bedrooms

Apollo 13, however, is the third show of the Original Theater Epidemic; Self-financing and large-scale filming in actors’ homes and bedrooms

The Royal Shakespeare Company, by contrast, announced additional reductions this week. . . Sorry, the consultation process. . For Furlugad staff, before a conscious re-opening of their main stage in December.

And the National Theater, which has also been promised money by the Treasury, will reopen next month with a solitary theme: the content is titled Death of England.

Apollo 13, however, is the third online show of the Original Theater Epidemic; Self-financing and large-scale filming in actors’ homes and bedrooms.

This is an amazing feat.

The direction of Charlotte Peters and Alastair Watley combines green screen animation with film footage of the launch, the moon and the earth, so that life can be recreated by riding on the injured module l lungpung.

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Interacting with the contemporary fusion of living astronauts Jim Lowell and Fred Hess, this is going to embarrass our Premier League theaters.

Using edited changes with mission control for a long time in the first half, Bates’ script uses the second half to imagine three people chewing on the issues of the day, as they revolve around the moon to save oxygen. Is.

So benevolent – ‘Huu stun, do you read?’ And ‘Roger Joe’ – gives way to the beautiful Corney (‘Love got us all to keep warm!’) Please, this is not a sign for the boys to take off their spacesuits, but citizens to debate such hot topics. As a legacy of authority and slavery.

To this end, Hayes is portrayed as an African-American (young Fred is played by Michael Salami; Old Fred is played by Geoff Aymer).

He has a feud with right-wing pilot Jack Swiggart (Tom Chambers), who went on to become a Republican politician; Urban captain Jim Lowell (Christopher Harper) keeps the peace. (Philip Franks plays Lovell in later life.)

Their talk is a bit fabricated, and I’m ashamed to say that social justice would not be high on my agenda if I were caught in the dark, freezing cold and a million miles from Earth.

Really impressive, though, is the voice of Dominic Bilki; Capturing the speed of radio communication, crackling and time delays as well as lift-off and ominous obstacles in the spacecraft.

The musical organ of the Sophie cotton and the rolling kettle drum combines the stressful violin. I recommend listening with good headphones.

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John Buchanan's novel The 39 Steps is a hilarious joke; Richard Haney pursued police and detectives in the Scottish Highlands in the 1930's when a mysterious murmur was committed in his London apartment.

John Buchanan’s novel The 39 Steps is a hilarious joke; Richard Haney pursued police and detectives in the Scottish Highlands in the 1930’s when a mysterious murmur was committed in his London apartment.

I’m also impressed with the Malting Theater in St. Albans, Hertfordshire, which began the whole fall season, starting with a parody of Patrick Barlow’s 39 steps in John Fall’s novel.

It’s a cheerful handkerchief; Richard Hayne pursued police and detectives in the Scottish Highlands in the 1930’s when a mysterious murmur was committed in his London apartment.

Yeah Al that sounds pretty crap to me, Looks like BT aint for me either.

Gags about wardrobe sets and breastfeeding social distances. And as our best English hero, with teeth, pencil mustache and middle pipe

Harris Tied, James Douglas has a high-selling comic feature that looks a little like Wallace, without Grimmett.

Bennett leaned over the bridge

Nights in the Gardens of Spain / Miss Fozgard finds her feet (Bridge Theater, London)

Rating:

Description: The end of summer solitude

The last of the Talking Heads Live Eka collection at the Bridge Theater in London, actress Tamsin Gregg and Maxine Peak, forming an interesting duo, showcasing Alan Bennett’s gift of light and color.

On the sloping side, Knights in the Garden of Spain sees Greg (left) pictured playing Rosemary, a rat suburb lady Rat, who befriended her neighbor who shot her husband after years of abuse.

The beginning is deceptively comfortable, as Rosemary addresses us from her conservatory, and overlooks her vast garden.

Her hands wrap around each other as she talks about her growing ties with France through the next door – exchanging letters, visiting the prison – before coming to a bad mood.

She’s a depressing woman, and Greg nailed her brilliantly, shaking her eyes quickly, with small eyebrows, short breaths, and all the excitement – before she was disappointed.

As Miss Fozgard, by contrast, Peak is a very prominent Yorkshire woman who received sexual treatment at the hands of a socky chiropodist.

Relaxes the peak part, saves every word. It’s a little performance, but fun.

I’m curious to know how the people of Yorkshire would love to be so brutally deceived by a corpse from Lancashire when Peak will change his turn (with Ailda Stanton in A Lady of Letters) at Leeds Playhouse and Sheffield’s Crucible next month.

Will Smith

About the author: Will Smith

Alfred Lee covers public and private tech markets from New York. He was previously a Knight-Bagehot Fellow in Economics and Business Journalism at Columbia University, and prior to that was a reporter at the Los Angeles Business Journal. He has received a Journalist of the Year award from the L.A. Press Club and an investigative reporting award from the Society of American Business Editors and Writers.

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