Two Americans convicted for helping Carlos Ghosn escape – 03/22/2021

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Tokyo, 22 March 2021 (AFP) – Tokyo prosecutors on Monday expelled Japan’s 2019 Lebanese CEO Carlos Ghosn, accused of fleeing Lebanon, despite financial allegations against the executive.

“The Special Investigation Unit (of the Tokyo MP) has asked the Tokyo court to prosecute the two for the first time on these charges,” a prosecution statement said.

Michael Taylor, a former United States Special Forces member who worked for the private security sector, and his son Peter were extradited from the United States in early March, ending all possibilities of an appeal Had given. The two were taken to the Kosuse detention center in Tokyo, where Ghosn remained in custody between November 2018 and April 2019.

Taylor was detained by US Justice in May 2020 on the basis of a Japanese arrest warrant. He remained in custody in the United States for his “high risk of escape”.

On December 31, 2019, the Japanese were surprised to learn that their most famous defendant, Carlos Ghosn, managed to escape to Lebanon.

Two days earlier, when he was released on bail to await trial for alleged financial fraud at Nissan, Lebanon-Brazil-Brazil judiciously left Tokyo and flew to Osaka (western Japan) on a train with two allies Gone.

Authorities suspect that he overcame the controls hidden in a large box of audio equipment in a private plane at Kansai International Airport near Osaka. At that time, equipment control was not mandatory in Japan for aircraft of this type.

Ghosan landed in Beirut after a halt in Istanbul on December 30, 2019.

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An American justice document sheds light on “one of the strongest and most planned escapes in recent history”.

The disgraced auto executive concerning Interpol’s request for arrest is out of reach of Japanese justice because Lebanon does not extradite its citizens. But Lebanese justice banned him from leaving the country.

kh-sah / ras / uh / erl-es / fp

About the author: Sarah Gracie

Sarahis a reporter covering Amazon. She previously covered tech and transportation, and she broke stories on Uber's finances, self-driving car program, and cultural crisis. Before that, she covered cybersecurity in finance. Sarah's work has appeared in The Wall Street Journal, Bloomberg, Politico, and the Houston Chronicle.

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