US women’s soccer team files appeal in action against gender discrimination

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(Reuters) – The US women’s football team today filed an appeal against the American Football Federation in its case for gender discrimination, alleging that the decision to deny the suit was based on flawed legal reasoning.

The appeal, filed with the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals, calls for the decision to be reversed and the case returned to the district court for jury.

The world champion team sued the federation in 2019, seeking $66 million in damages under the Equal Pay Act, alleging gender discrimination in pay and almost every other aspect of the playing conditions.

Los Angeles District Judge R. Gary Klausner last year dismissed the players’ allegations that they were paid less than the men’s team and weeks later denied the players’ attempts to appeal until the element of circumstances. The task was resolved.

Molly Levinson, spokeswoman for the women’s national team, said, “If a woman has to work harder than men and be far more successful than her in order to get almost the same pay, it is certainly not equal and is not a matter of law.” infringes.” Announcement.

“And yet, that’s exactly what US national team players do. They play more games and get the same amount per game as men’s national team players to get better results,” he said.

“By any measure, this is not equal pay and it violates federal law … We believe the facts show intentional – and persistent – gender discrimination by the United States Football Federation.”

The US federation has issued a statement in response, saying it is “committed to equal pay”, adding that it continues to seek solutions with players from outside the court system.

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The US women’s team is competing at the Tokyo Olympics, where they lost their first match 3–0 to Sweden. The team will face New Zealand on Saturday.

(Reporting by Ritika Sharma in Bengaluru)

About the author: Sarah Gracie

Sarahis a reporter covering Amazon. She previously covered tech and transportation, and she broke stories on Uber's finances, self-driving car program, and cultural crisis. Before that, she covered cybersecurity in finance. Sarah's work has appeared in The Wall Street Journal, Bloomberg, Politico, and the Houston Chronicle.

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