Guedes demands more aggression from Itamarti in commercial negotiations

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Amid talks to change Mercosur rules, Economy Minister Paulo Guedes called on the foreign ministry to be more aggressive in trade talks. At a ceremony in Itamarti, Geddes said that he is used to playing a “boring role” in these conversations.

“Congratulations

chancellor carlos

France to move forward on the agenda of making Itamartia more aggressive. He’s the ‘good guy,’ I’m the ‘bad guy,'” he said. “I think Itamarati should be more aggressive. In the United States, ambassadors are almost business people.”

At the event, Geddes also demanded that the ministries of the economy and foreign affairs come closer. The ministers do not hide their dissatisfaction with the pace at which the MERCOSUR talks are progressing.

Guedes wants to reduce the Mercosur Common External Tariffs this year, the period of Brazil’s rotating presidency, but, as shown by Broadcast (Grupo Estado’s real-time news system), it faces difficulties. Used to be.

This Tuesday, Guedes said that, now, sanctions are coming from Uruguay, a first participant in the minister’s liberal agenda.

After Argentina agreed to reduce tariffs on part of the products to 10% – less than what it wanted – now, according to Guedes, Uruguayans say they support the proposal only if MERCOSUR agrees to bilateral talks. Supports, in other words, with countries outside the block.

Under current rules, tariff negotiations can only be conducted jointly with third parties by the four countries of the bloc. “Brazil is one of the world’s most closed economies, we are behind. We are trying to make up for lost time with trade agreements,” he said.

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Geddes also said he needed Congressional support on the Mercosur modernization agenda. ”

Argentine people

They wanted to use our Congress against them.”

About the author: Sarah Gracie

Sarahis a reporter covering Amazon. She previously covered tech and transportation, and she broke stories on Uber's finances, self-driving car program, and cultural crisis. Before that, she covered cybersecurity in finance. Sarah's work has appeared in The Wall Street Journal, Bloomberg, Politico, and the Houston Chronicle.

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