Hertfordshire Police Condemn Newspaper Printer Blockade for ‘Facilitating’ Press Attack

Hertfordshire police are on fire for failing to stop a rebellious blockade of newspaper printing presses on Friday.

XR Action observed that the protesters targeted the printing work of Newspr printers in Brooksburn, Hertfordshire and Nosley, near Liverpool, preventing the day newspapers from leaving the depot.

The operation began at 10pm on Friday when protesters were not cleared until 10am the next day, leaving hundreds of Britons unable to read their newspaper on Saturday morning.

Now, the police response has been condemned with allegations that Hertfordshire police “facilitated” the attack.

It has come to light that XR’s intention to target the newspaper’s printwork was announced nine months ago, with it being claimed that police had only arrested six officers at the Brooksburn plant after the alarm went off on Friday night. Was sent.

The Hertfordshire Constabulary said in a statement: “The rights to protest are well established in this country and we are committed to facilitating peaceful protests and ensuring the rule of law.”

However, this stance was criticized by many high-profile individuals.

Former Labor Home Secretary David Blankett said: ‘I think they are joining the historic debate. [union] Dispelling protests related to political issues, which can be dealt with through a normal democratic process. ‘

Richard Walton, former head of Matt’s Counterterrorism Command and now a senior associate at Policy Exchange, said Friday’s protest showed how the group had changed from just a protester to a “planned crime”, and that Should be treated as such.

“Their vision of doing so undermines our democracy and strengthens extremist groups like the XR.”

Former Labor Home Secretary David Blanket Criticizes Police Response to Expansion Mutiny

Former Labor Home Secretary David Blanket Criticizes Police Response to Expansion Mutiny

Ian Austin, a Labor MP, told the Telegraph: “The police must follow the law, people must be able to go to work and read the documents they choose. ‘

This was followed by Donchdach McCarthy, the XR’s spokesman for the Boxbourne protest, at which only six officers joined the protest at 10.15pm, with reports that police had not been warned in advance.

A Hertfordshire police spokesman declined to confirm how many officers were present.

Police also insisted that despite claims of planning from last year, there was no warning of protest before they proceeded.

XR launched a plan to target the media in October last year and reportedly sought to disrupt the publication of papers published by Rupert Murdoch, the Telegraph Media Group and the Daily Mail and General Trust.

A document obtained by a newspaper on Sunday last December showed how “weak” Brooksburn was because managers had a roadblock.

Merseyside police announced this morning that they had indicted 26 people between the ages of 19 and 60 after a protest at the News International compound in Nosley on Friday night.

He is scheduled to appear in Liverpool and Nozley Magistrates ‘Court and St. Helens Magistrates’ Court on January 8 and 13 next year.

Police said all 26 have been granted bail on condition that they do not enter Mercedes or contact any News International staff.

On Friday evening, more than 100 protesters used vehicles and bamboo lock-locks to block roads outside newspaper outlets, both continuing until Saturday afternoon.

Hertfordshire police say they have arrested 50 people.

XR apologized in the news for the disruption, but added that it would not apologize to Mr Murdoch, telling him to “stop suppressing the truth about the weather crisis and make a profit from the distribution of your papers”.

Official sources have confirmed that Home Secretary Preeti Patel wants to take a fresh look at how the XR is classified under the law after a stuntman, Boris Johnson, was deemed “completely unacceptable”.

With this review, XR could be considered an organized crime group, sources said, as part of a crackdown on its activities, including human trafficking along major roads and disrupting public transport across the UK. This includes stopping cities.

Additional resolutions may give special status to Parliament, the courts and the press in relation to their important role in democracy, giving the police beef-up powers to prevent people from entering designated areas outside such premises. Can

“It will be illegal to prevent MPs from voting or judges from going to court and it will also protect an independent press,” an official source told the PA.

Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab said he thought police already had the power to deal with the protests.

Speaking to Sky News’ Sophie Ridge on Sunday, she said: “We always keep all our laws under review but I think the law is really in place to enforce the law against criminal behavior. ‘

Protesters were seen refraining from slapping a 10,000 fine on coronavirus violators.

Jeremy Corbyn’s brother Pierce was given the first fine of 10,000 in London for holding an illegal gathering after holding a march last week claiming a coronavirus.

The 73-year-old meteorologist led more than 10,000 protesters at a “United for Freedom” rally in Trafalgar Square on Saturday.

Corbyn, the former Labor leader’s older brother, was seen being harassed by authorities after the incident, and his Twitter account confirmed that he had been fined heavily and ” Was kept for ten hours. ‘

He was among eight other offenders who were fined in the rest of England under new lockdown measures set up on Friday to prevent more than 30 people from gathering.

Others who were fined were all conducting raids or organizing house parties.

Members of the Displacement Rebellion appear to have escaped punishment.

Responding to Ms Patel’s criticism that her actions were an attack on ‘our independent press’, XR said:’ Our independent press, society and democracy are under attack – a failed government that constantly lies to us, increasing dictatorship. Is forming and is leading us to four degrees warming. ‘

The protest has been criticized for being politically motivated.

An XR statement said the action was about racism as well as “immigration policy, the rights and treatment of minority groups and dozens of other issues.”

Cory Weinberg

About the author: Cory Weinberg

Cory Weinberg covers the intersection of tech and cities. That means digging into how startups and big tech companies are trying to reshape real estate, transportation, urban planning, and travel. Previously, he reported on Bay Area housing and commercial real estate for the San Francisco Business Times. He received a "best young journalist" award from the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

Related Posts

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *