Japan requires daily COVID-19 tests from India and UK at Games

Japan requires daily COVID-19 tests from India and UK at Games

The Japanese government has set up two groups of countries whose delegations must undergo daily coronavirus testing for seven days in the case of India, or every three days in the UK, before traveling to Tokyo for the Olympic Games.

According to Japanese officials, the measure is justified by the “high level of risk due to the occurrence of variants” of the SARS-CoV-2 virus.

Group 1 consists of Afghanistan, India, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan and Sri Lanka. Delegations from these countries, including athletes, technical committees, officials, referees and journalists, will undergo daily coronavirus testing for seven days before traveling to Japan. During this period, competitors cannot train with representatives from other countries.

Athletes and their crew will also be tested daily when they reach Japanese territory. In his first three days in the Asian country, he will not be able to interact or even train with members of other delegations.

Group 2 risk countries are Bangladesh, Egypt, Malaysia, the United Kingdom and Vietnam. In this case, its participants in the Olympic Games must pass control three days before their travel to Japan and three days after their arrival, in addition to avoiding contact with people from other countries during this period.

“These groups are subject to change,” the Japanese government warned in a document sent to international federations. “The Japanese government, like many others, has established specific rules for travelers from certain countries where different variants of COVID-19 have been identified, in an effort to control the virus and prevent its spread,” the correspondence completes. it happens.

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About the author: Sarah Gracie

Sarahis a reporter covering Amazon. She previously covered tech and transportation, and she broke stories on Uber's finances, self-driving car program, and cultural crisis. Before that, she covered cybersecurity in finance. Sarah's work has appeared in The Wall Street Journal, Bloomberg, Politico, and the Houston Chronicle.

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