Pelosi exposes 25th amendment bid, questions Trump’s health

Pelosi exposes 25th amendment bid, questions Trump's health
Washington: House Speaker Nancy Pelosi Unwanted legislation will be allowed Friday Congress To intervene under 25th Amendment To remove the President from the Constitution, insist it is not about the President Donald Trump But motivated by the need for more musical supervision of his White House.
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Pelosi has questioned Trump’s mental health since his Kovid-19 diagnosis and called for more transparency in his health. The bill would set up a commission to assess the president’s ability to lead the country and ensure continuity of government. It comes a year after the Pelosi House launched a crackdown on Trump.
“It’s not about President Donald Trump – he will have to face the decision of the voters,” Pelosi told a news conference in the Capitol.
In the weeks leading up to the November 3 election, the bill was not expected to become law, and Trump’s team and top allies immediately dismissed the rollout as a stunt.
“This is a ridiculous proposal,” said Kelly McNenny, White House press secretary at Fox.
“Absolutely stupid,” McConnell, a Senate Majority Leader, said in an appearance in Sheffieldsville, Kentucky.
Opponents of the president have been debating the 25th Amendment for some time, but are now raising it, very close to Election Day, as campaigns are rapidly turning into a referendum on Trump’s coronavirus epidemic.
Pelosi said Trump needed to make more disclosures about his health after his Kovid-19 diagnosis and that, of course, he had compromised earlier. Covid. More than 210,000 Americans have died and millions more have tested positive for the virus, which is not a sign of the difficult flu season and winter as warned by public health experts.
The law, which would create a commission under the 25th Amendment, passed by Congress and approved in 1967 to ensure the continuation of power after the assassination of President John F. Kennedy.
It says the vice president and the majority of top officials in the executive branch “or other organizations like the Congress” can declare to Congress by law that the president is “incapable of discharging the powers and duties of his office.” At that point, the vice president will immediately assume the powers of the acting president.
“Let the Congress use the power given to us by the Constitution.” Pelosi said this while standing in front of the amendment poster on Friday.
Pelosi was joined by reporter Jamie Ruskin, D-Mom, a constitutional scholar who has been proposing similar bills in the past.
“In times of chaos, we must uphold our constitution,” he said on Friday.
Ruskin said the commission would only be set up “for very serious cases.”
However, as the Congress has shown by impressing and acquitting the President in the last year, the legislature is determined to use itself as an executive branch of inquiry at times.
“Congress has a role to play,” Ruskin said.
Trump says he is “feeling very well” after being hospitalized and has returned to work at the White House. But her doctors have given mixed indications about her diagnosis and treatment. Trump plans to resume the campaign soon.
The Congress is not in the Assembly session, and therefore no serious consideration is likely to be given to this measure of allowing voting in the House or the Senate. But the bill serves as a political tool to question Trump’s health as his own White House is infecting top colleagues, staff and audiences, including senators.
In a shocking admission, McConnell said Thursday that he stopped going to the White House two months ago because he disagreed with its coronavirus protocol. His last visit was on August 6.
“My impression was how to handle it, it was different from me and what I insisted on in the Senate is to wear a mask and practice social distances,” McConnell replied. Said at a campaign stop for himself in Kentucky. Re-election
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About the author: Muhammad Wayne

Wayne is a reporter who covers everything from oil trading to China's biggest conglomerates and technology companies. Originally from Chicago, he is a graduate of New York University's business and economic reporting program.

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