See how Brazilian cities could be affected by higher sea levels, according to research. Climate

See how Brazilian cities could be affected by higher sea levels, according to research.  Climate

Measuring and presenting the impact of global temperature rise and sea level rise, a survey conducted by Climate Central, a non-profit organization based in the United States in partnership with Princeton University and the Potsdam Institute of Climate Impact Survey in Germany was the subject. .

The work, published in the journal Environmental Research Letters, identified areas of the world that could experience “unprecedented” flooding if policies to combat climate change are not implemented by countries now.

Below, see examples of Climate Central’s projections for some cities in Brazil:

Salvador, Region of Elevador Lacerda

Salvador’s vision in the current panorama — Photo: Climate Central/Publication

Simulations for Salvador observing a 1.5ºC increase in temperature — Photo: Climate Central/Publication

Simulations for Salvador observing a 3ºC rise in temperature — Photo: Climate Central/Publication

View of Recife, Casa Amarela area

View of Recife, Casa Amarela area, current location — Photo: Climate Central/Divulgaçao

Recife, seen from the Casa Amarela area, projection with a rise in temperature by 1.5 °C – Photo: Climate Central / Publications

Recife, seen from the Casa Amarela area, projection with a rise in temperature by 3 °C – Photo: Climate Central / Publications

Fortaleza, Mukurip Lighthouse Area

Fortaleza, Mukurip Lighthouse Area: Current Location — Photo: Climate Central/Disclosure

Fortaleza, Mucuripe Lighthouse Area: Projection with an increment of 1.5°C n — Photo: Climate Central/Disclosure

Fortaleza, Mucuripe Lighthouse Area: Projection with an increase of 3°C — Photo: Climate Central/Disclosure

Porto Alegre, area of ​​Usina do Gasometro

Porto Alegre, Usina do Gas-Metro Region: Current Status – Photo: Climate Central / Disclosure

Porto Alegre, area of ​​the Usina do Gas metro: projection with a rise in temperature by 1.5ºC — Photo: Climate Central/Publication

Porto Alegre, area of ​​the Usina do Gasometro: Temperature projection at 3ºC — Photo: Climate Central/Publication

Rio de Janeiro, Botafogo station area

Rio de Janeiro, area of ​​Botafogo station: current panorama and 1.5 °C rise – Photo: Climate Central / Disclosure

Rio de Janeiro, Botafogo station area: Global temperatures projected to rise by 3 °C – Photo: Climate Central / Disclosure

According to the researchers, in a worst-case scenario, a rise in temperature (up to 4 °C) could cause the ocean to invade land occupied by up to 15% of the current global population, which is equivalent to about one billion people.

“On the other hand, the chances of meeting the more ambitious goals of the Paris climate agreement will be cut by half,” say the scientists.

Floods, snow and extreme heat: how climate change affects the planet

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About the author: Muhammad Wayne

Wayne is a reporter who covers everything from oil trading to China's biggest conglomerates and technology companies. Originally from Chicago, he is a graduate of New York University's business and economic reporting program.

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