Sudan and Israel agree to normalize relations in US-brokered deal: NPR

Sudan and Israel agree to normalize relations in US-brokered deal: NPR

President Trump held talks with Sudanese and Israeli leaders on Friday as they announced that Sudan would normalize relations with Israel at the White House. The United States has removed Sudan from its list of terrorist sponsors. And is assisting in Sudan’s huge debt.

By Alex Admlan / AFP Getty Images


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By Alex Admlan / AFP Getty Images

President Trump held talks with Sudanese and Israeli leaders on Friday as they announced that Sudan would normalize relations with Israel at the White House. The United States has removed Sudan from its list of terrorist sponsors. And is assisting in Sudan’s huge debt.

By Alex Admlan / AFP Getty Images

The countries and the United States announced on Friday that Israel and Sudan have agreed to normalize their relations and normalize economic and trade ties. The United States said earlier this week that it would remove Sudan from state sponsors of the terror list as part of the deal.

“This is a unique deal for Israel and Sudan,” President Trump said at the Oval Office, according to a White House pool report. “Sudan has been at war with Israel for decades. It has been at war and has boycotted Israeli things. It had nothing to do with it.”

There has been a change of government in Sudan since last year, when the military ousted longtime dictator Omar al-Bashir following a popular uprising. As Trump announced earlier this week, the country recently agreed to pay 5 5,335 million into a fund for victims of American terrorism and their families.

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“Once submitted, I will remove Sudan from the state sponsors list of terrorists.” Trump said.

Sudan has been working hard to break US sanctions on the US terrorist list by taking steps to settle claims related to the US bombing 20 years ago and agree to pay for the 1998 bombings at the US embassies in Nairobi and Tanzania .

But Sudan recently faced a new hurdle in getting out of the list of terrorists, when Secretary of State Mike Popeppio told the country that he needed to “sign the Trump administration’s Middle East agenda and normalize relations with Israel.” Will also be needed, ”NPR’s Michelle Kelman reported earlier this month.

Trump’s announcement of a payment agreement and his promise to lift the terrorism-sponsoring label have fueled speculation that Sudan will join Bahrain and the United Arab Emirates in agreeing to establish ties with Israel.

Palestinian leaders have long called on Arab nations not to establish relations with Israel unless there is peace between Israel and the Palestinians. On Friday, the office of Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas condemned the Israeli-Sudan deal.

As part of this week’s agreement, the United States will also help Sudan settle billions of dollars in international debt.

Trump promised that other nations would like to establish relations with Israel – perhaps including Iran.

“I can finally see Iran – it’s a voice now, it doesn’t seem like anything is happening, but I see it happening,” the president said.

“Ultimately, they will all be a united family,” Trump added. “It would be a surprise. It probably never happened in the Middle East, because the Middle East is known for conflict and war.”

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The leaders of the United States, Israel and Sudan today held talks to discuss Sudan’s historic progress towards democracy and opportunities for peace in the region. It added that the historic change would boost regional security and open up new opportunities for the people of Sudan and Israel, as well as their neighbors.

Resolving terrorism compensation claims against Sudan could also end a complex and painful legal process: in 2018, the Trump administration sided with Sudan and the USS against those who, by agreement, sought compensation. The children’s trial should have been sent to the Sudanese Foreign Ministry in Khartoum instead of its embassy in Washington. The U.S. Supreme Court rules 315 million Last year, Sudan and the US government agreed.

Cory Weinberg

About the author: Cory Weinberg

Cory Weinberg covers the intersection of tech and cities. That means digging into how startups and big tech companies are trying to reshape real estate, transportation, urban planning, and travel. Previously, he reported on Bay Area housing and commercial real estate for the San Francisco Business Times. He received a "best young journalist" award from the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

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