Trump’s apology to Blackwater officials violates international law, U.N. says

Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally at Cecil Airport in Jacksonville, Photo: TOM BRENNER / REUTERS - 9/24/2020

Geneva – US President Donald Trump’s apology to four Americans convicted of killing Iraqi civilians Private Security Company Blackwater It violated US obligations under international law in 2007, UN human rights experts said on Wednesday.

Nicholas Slayton was convicted of first-degree murder, while Paul Sloo, Evan Liberty and Dustin Hurd were convicted for voluntary manslaughter and attempting to open fire in a crowded Baghdad Square and assassinate 14 unarmed Iraqi civilians. I went.

Four Blackwater employees owned by Trump’s education secretary’s brother were included in one Prenatal President Pardon Package Declared by the White House.

In a statement, UN Working Group chairwoman Jelena Aprack said, “Forgiveness of Blackwyer’s employees is a struggle for justice and for the victims of the Niskor Square Massacre and their families.”

UN experts said the Geneva Convention holds war criminals accountable for their crimes, even if they act as private security agents.

Christmas Package:Trump forgives more allies including former publicity chief, friend and father-in-law’s father

Aparac said that by allowing private security agents to “work with remuneration in armed conflicts”, states are trying to fulfill their obligations. “These pardons violate US obligations under international law and are more harmful to humanitarian law and human rights globally.”

Were sorry Heavily criticized In the United States. General David Petras and Ryan Crocker, respectively, commanders of the US Armed Forces and the US Ambassador to Iraq at the time of the incident, called Trump’s pardon “extremely damaging”, an action that reveals to the world – that crimes can be committed abroad. More disgusted with impatience “.

See also  South Korea, China agree on North Korea talks, early Xi tour | China

The White House, in a statement announcing the amnesty, said the move was “widely supported by the public” and many Republican congressmen.

Four years after the US invasion of Iraq, the massacre took place under the false pretext that Saddam Hussein had weapons of mass destruction.

About the author: Muhammad Wayne

Wayne is a reporter who covers everything from oil trading to China's biggest conglomerates and technology companies. Originally from Chicago, he is a graduate of New York University's business and economic reporting program.

Related Posts

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *