Without sponsorship and staying at the coach’s house, Fabiana Mores dreams of a vacancy in Tokyo

During childhood, Fabiana Mores was the target Naughty in school. Considered to be very thin and tall, he was chased by his teammates and nicknamed Papel. With a strong personality, whenever she was harassed, she would buy battles. More than that: He used biotypes in his favor to succeed in sports. First, as a goalkeeper for the futsal team. Finally, in athletics, for which he reached the podium in the Student Games. Long ago, he changed the nickname’s abusive tone.

– Became a legend at Papel High School. Because I was fast and flew like paper. Even the parents of the students recognized me – remembering Fabiana, who specialized in the 100-meter barrier, for which she competed in the Rio-2016 Games.

He is motivated by further obstacles. Presently, he again finds himself in an unfavorable position. He left Brazil amid an epidemic in preparation for preparations in the US.

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With a little money he runs a double race against time. Obtaining funds to make it possible to reach the Olympic Index by 29 June and, at the same time, participate in pre-Games competitions in Tokyo. Once again, you will need the paper that you keep inside.

– At first my goal was to become an Olympic athlete. I have reached it. But we always want to excel in sports. In this case, I want a medal. I took a risk at a certain point in my life and was successful. Now, I am also taking my chances.

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Without sponsorship, she can still only rely on Bolsa Atleta’s income. But, with the federal government’s delay in issuing the final public notice, it has not been received since March, when payments for the 2019 season have ended. From June, it will be received for 2021 (which have been canceled for 2020).

Conceived in the Olympic category, Fabiana is entitled to R $ 3,100 per month. But what you need is not enough: R $ 100 thousand. According to his calculations, the figure includes entries for competitions, travel, accommodation and meals for him and his coach Lauren Seagrave. She has several shows in the United States and Europe between May and June to improve her time and reach the 12s84 mark required to travel to Tokyo.

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– This is my best brand – Carioca from Santa Cruz says, referring to her achievement in 2017, which made her the second best index on the continent after Maureen Maggie’s record (12s71, 2001).

Race for dreams

Fabiana is running after money. It has already approved a project through the incentive law of the Rio State Government for those who wish to sponsor it in return for an exemption from ICMS:

– Why not invest in this athlete who has the ability that I have already realized? Now, to reach the Olympics and finals, I understand that I need to increase my average results. And for this I need to compete at a higher level and with my coach.

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The ability to develop projects does not stop here. A graduate in marketing, she used the first months of the epidemic to organize her clothing brand, Brazil Nation. Inspired by their experience as an athlete, they will serve both players and the public. The company aims to become an event organizer and platform that unites athletes and professionals in the field. But partnering with the factory is the first step to turn clothing into reality.

While this moment does not come, Fabiana focuses on the tracks. An injury halted his best moment, between 2016 and 2017, with a result of less than 13 seconds. Today, at the age of 34, he is placing high bets to try to return to the top of the Brazilian rankings.

Fabiana and Seagrave have been working together since late 2019. But Kovid interrupted his plans. He lives in Atlanta, USA. The epidemic not only prevented him from coming to Brazil (where he is also an advisor to the COB) but also shut down most of the sports facilities in the country for months.

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Assuming that, in order to achieve her best performance, she needs to be close to Seagrave (who has coached Olympic champions like Canadian Donovan Bailey and American Justin Gatlin), Fabiana traveled in April this year. They abandoned the structure that COB Rio offers athletes to go after jobs that meet 100% of their needs.

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Living in another country, being a personal trainer, comes at a cost in addition to caring for other professionals (such as nutritionists and psychologists). She lives in Seagrave’s house to reduce expenses. But their savings are not enough.

– I am the debtor of my apartment, I am in debt – they say.

In a country where the sport lacks money and most unions are unable to finance their talent, Fabiana’s story represents many other Brazilian athletes. As charming as the cliché is, his tenacity cannot be confused with heroism. Unlike the obstacles, which she jumps on the tracks, those present in real life will not need to be present. But, like Papel, it resists. And he tries to make disaster a stepping stone:

– I am very proud to talk about where I came from and where I arrived. I have grown up at home with many difficulties. Because of my father being aggressive towards my mother, I am being bullied at school … Sports have always been my life, my escape valve. He saves people.

Sarah Gracie

About the author: Sarah Gracie

Sarahis a reporter covering Amazon. She previously covered tech and transportation, and she broke stories on Uber's finances, self-driving car program, and cultural crisis. Before that, she covered cybersecurity in finance. Sarah's work has appeared in The Wall Street Journal, Bloomberg, Politico, and the Houston Chronicle.

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