COVID-19: Malta is the first EU country to close borders to unvaccinated travellers. coronavirus

COVID-19: Malta is the first EU country to close borders to unvaccinated travellers.  coronavirus

the government of Malta announced on Friday (9) that it will not accept the entry of passengers who have not been vaccinated for COVID-19. country is first European Union (EU) To announce a measure to try to stop the spread of the delta variant.

“From Wednesday, 14 July, everyone arriving in Malta must present a recognized vaccination certificate: a Maltese certificate, a British certificate or an EU certificate,” the country’s health minister Chris Fairney announced during a press conference. .

As of June 1, tourists from the European Union, the United States and some other countries that have managed to contain the Covid-19 pandemic can enter this paradise island in the Mediterranean Sea – the main European destinations during summer in the Northern Hemisphere. one of.

By next Tuesday (13), it will be possible to land in Malta, which will present a negative PCR test for COVID-19. However, from July 14, the rule changes and only fully immunized passengers will be able to access the site.

The only exception would be children below 12 years of age with their parents, whose negative PCR test would continue to be required. The European Health Agency has authorized vaccination against COVID-19 for young people aged 12 years and over.

This small Mediterranean island of 500,000 people takes pride in being the country with the highest vaccination rate in the European Union. Overall, 79% of the population over the age of 12 received two doses of an anti-COVID immunizing agent.

However, recently there have been a large number of cases among young people who travel to Malta to study English. For now, the island still does not face the wave of the delta version like many European countries, but wants to keep tensions from spreading in the region.

According to Malta’s public health official, Charmaine Gaussi, of the 252 active COVID-19 cases currently in the country, only 7 are of Indian origin. Since the start of the pandemic, the Maltese government has recorded 30,851 cases of the disease and 420 deaths.

When asked about the sudden announcement, the Health Minister clarified. “It is not fair to put our citizens at risk. We must first take care of our residents”, he defended.

Europe strengthens measures against Delta

The delta version is spreading rapidly and worries European governments. Several countries have announced new measures to stem the rise in infection by the strain, which is highly contagious and mainly infects people who have not been vaccinated.

“The epidemiological situation in Catalonia is extremely complex,” the Catalan government spokeswoman, Patricia Plaza, explained last Tuesday (6). According to him, the number of cases in the region is increasing rapidly, especially among young people.

In the Netherlands, Prime Minister Mark Root on Friday announced new measures that will take effect from this Saturday, such as the closure of clubs. Bars and restaurants are expected to close at midnight.

In France, although Delta represents about 50% of new contamination, clubs reopened on Friday, but only for those who have a health passport. The French government is considering making vaccinations mandatory for health professionals and new announcements are expected on Monday (12), when President Emmanuel Macron will make a statement.

The Latvian armed forces said on Friday that all active soldiers would be vaccinated by next August. Anyone who does not agree with the decision runs the risk of losing their job.

Russia, facing a strong wave of the delta version, announced a new record on Saturday: 752 deaths in 24 hours. In the same period, 25,082 new cases were registered in the country, of which 5,694 are in the capital Moscow.

Video: International News

Muhammad Wayne

About the author: Muhammad Wayne

Wayne is a reporter who covers everything from oil trading to China's biggest conglomerates and technology companies. Originally from Chicago, he is a graduate of New York University's business and economic reporting program.

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