Pope Francis says opposition bosses are trapped in ‘their own little world of interests’

Pope Francis has taken aim Protest against coronavirus restrictions, In contrast to the “healthy rage” seen in anti-racism protests after his death George Floyd.

“Some groups protested and marched against travel bans, refusing to keep their distance – as governments should impose for the good of their people so that any kind of political attack on autonomy or individual freedom could take place.

He protested against those who claimed that “being forced to wear a mask is unofficially imposed by the state”.

“You will never see such people protesting against death George Floyd, Or join a demonstration because there are quiet towns where children lack water or education, or because there are entire families who have lost their income, ”he said. “They will never oppose such things; They are unable to go beyond the world of their petty interests. ”

The book, Let Us Dream: A Path to a Better Future, is based on an interview with British biographer Ten Stun Everigh and focuses primarily on his response to the coronavirus crisis.

“With a few exceptions, governments have made great strides in putting the health of their people first, working decisively to protect health and save lives,” he said.

However, he said some people have put the economy ahead of public health. “Those governments are holding their people hostage,” he said.

The death in police custody of Floyd, a 44-year-old African-American man, sparked a wave of anti-racism protests in the United States and around the world.

The pope then condemned the “terrible” death and how he welcomed the fact that “many people who did not know each other took to the streets in a fit of rage to protest. ”

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However he acknowledged that their numbers were not enough to defeat President Conte’s government, and called for an end to the protests.

“Free people are people who remember, are able to own its history instead of denying it, and learn the best lessons from it,” he said.

About the author: Muhammad Wayne

Wayne is a reporter who covers everything from oil trading to China's biggest conglomerates and technology companies. Originally from Chicago, he is a graduate of New York University's business and economic reporting program.

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