This flying American story hated Indira Gandhi and the IAF

This flying American story hated Indira Gandhi and the IAF
WASHINGTON: Chuck Yegir, the story of an American flight that was the first to break the noise barrier, was told by the Pakistani military, but when his air force was respected by many Indian pilots, his There was a joke button in the sudden and political bias. After the diplomatic circuit when he went all over Pakistan during the 1971 war. Aeger has never forgiven Indian and IAF pilots for destroying their beloved twin-engine beachcraft.

US fighter pilot Chuck Yager dies at 97 on December 8 (AFP photo)

Yeger, who died on December 8, 1997, was appointed head of the Military Assistance Advisory Group (MAAG) in Pakistan, with the “minor task” of seeing that US military aid was properly disposed of. Was distributed among Pakistanis and “Pakistanis are being taught how to use US military equipment in the process without killing themselves,” said Edward Ingram, who serves at the US Embassy in Islamabad.

“One of the demands for Yezier’s position was a two-engineer Beechcraft, a small aircraft supplied by the Pentagon to help locate fragments of US military equipment that were suddenly visible in the country. . Ambassador (Joseph) Farland, however, wrote in an article entitled Ingram, “A true motivational fisherman, he found that Beechcraft was an ideal vehicle to take him to other remote lakes and rivers of Pakistan.” “That’s right,” Ingram wrote in an article. “That’s right.

Chuck Yegir, second from left, with some cast from the film The Right Stuff (US Air Force photo by New York Times)

Chuck Yegir, second from left, with some cast from the film The Right Stuff (US Air Force photo by New York Times)

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Ingram describes a US embassy in Pakistan where staff is increasingly grappling with a deeper Indo-Pakistani crisis and meetings often become more and more stressful. “We were disturbed by the complex questions that led to the confrontation. There seems to be no such doubt in Chak Yegir’s mind. I was reminded of an occasion when Ferland asked Yeger for his assessment of how long the Pakistan Army could face in the East. He replied, ‘Maybe we can stop them for a month, but other than that we don’t have a chance without outside help?’ Ingram writes that he took a moment to realize our words that at first he did not realize that “we” were West Pakistan, not the United States, “Ingram writes. When Ingram asked him a little more in his remarks. Asked to understand, he says that Eager gave him a glimpse and said, “God this, we have been sent to Pakistan. What’s wrong with being faithful ?! ”

Chuck Yeiger never forgave India for destroying its twin-engine beachcraft during the 1971 war.

Chuck Yeiger never forgave India for destroying its twin-engine beachcraft during the 1971 war.

According to Ingraham, Yigar started a personal war with India in the morning after the Western Front was opened by the then military ruler of Pakistan, Yahya Khan. Before the Indian counter-attack, he says, the Pakistanis were so smart that they had to take their planes out of the airports near the Indian border, but no one thought to warn General Yeger. “Thus, when an Indian fighter pilot landed at Islamabad airport in India’s first counter-strike, he could see only two small planes on the ground. The second was a ship used by UN forces to supply patrols overseeing the ceasefire in Kashmir.

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Captain Charles & # 39;  Bite  Yair with the Bell X-1 that he flew to break the sound barrier (US Air Force photo by New York Times)

Capt. Charles ‘Chuck’ Yezier with the Bell X-1 who flew to break the sound barrier (US Air Force photo by New York Times)

Ingram said he never knew how the United Nations had reacted to the shipwreck, “but Yeiger’s response was nothing but sadness. He angered his colleagues at a staff meeting at the embassy.” His voice was loudly proclaimed that he was an Indian pilot, not only did he know exactly what he was doing, but he was instructed by Indira Gandhi specifically to fly Yager’s plane. He said it was an Indian way of ‘giving a finger’ to Uncle Sam.

“Our response to this Indian atrocity, as I recall, was Washington’s highest priority cable, which deliberately called the incident an act for the American nation and recommended immediate condemnation. I don’t think we Ever had an answer? ” Ingram writes with hatred for Yeger’s anger.

Yeiger insisted that when Pakistan was defeated on land and at sea, it had won an air war against India in 1971 (AFP photo).

Yeiger insisted that when Pakistan was defeated on land and at sea, it had won an air war against India in 1971 (AFP photo).

The Indian pilot who destroyed Yeger’s plane was Arun Prakash, who will become the chief of the navy, but he was an exchange pilot with the IAF at the time. In a bio-in-cheek account of an episode of Air Magazine a few years ago, Prakash recounts how he destroyed a Hercules C-130 in the first race after finding it during a second run at Chakla Airfield. Fixed.

“After reading Ingram’s account, and especially after retiring from the Navy, the idea crossed my mind that perhaps Yazir had come to her from Mrs. Gandhi. And if Indira Gandhi did indeed order the dismantling of Chuck Yageger’s beakercraft, then Nixon should have personally justified this by instructing the Enterprise Task Force to go to the Bay of Bengal. “In which case the honors are equal, and I apologize,” Prakash wrote, sticking his tongue in his throat. Anyone, except UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon! ”

Yegir, however, carried the torch well for Pakistan in the years to come and insisted that while Pakistan had lost on land and at sea, it had won the air war. When asked on a recent Twitter exchange which pilots flew with him, whom he highly respects, he named the Pakistanis. “In 1971-73, I ran with the Pakistan Air Force in the war with India. They were the best in the world because they had the most experience – 75 hours / month,” he wrote.

Although Yeager’s account of the Indo-Pak conflict is a lot of noise surrounded by military historians, what he is being remembered for today is breaking his voice.

Muhammad Wayne

About the author: Muhammad Wayne

Wayne is a reporter who covers everything from oil trading to China's biggest conglomerates and technology companies. Originally from Chicago, he is a graduate of New York University's business and economic reporting program.

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